leverage

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lev·er·age

(lev'ĕr-ăj),
1. The actual lift or elevating direction of a lever or elevator.
2. The mechanical advantage gained thereby.

lev·er·age

(lev'ĕr-ăj)
Actual lift or elevating direction of a lever or elevator.
References in periodicals archive ?
Is regulatory leveraging a normal, legitimate, and perhaps inevitable feature of agency design?
Difficulties in mobilizing, leveraging, and repurposing the value that resides in the resources of colleges and universities
Learning curves are reduced by leveraging an IT group's existing knowledge of IP networks and their understanding of their preferred LAN supplier's products.
Truly unprecedented system credit expansion underpinned buoyant asset markets: From the household and government sectors, on the one hand, and financial sector leveraging on the other.
The ability to gain an in-depth understanding of customers is dependent upon the leveraging of customer data from within the enterprise data warehouse.
As a result, economies of scale associated with leveraging the Internet's telecommunications infrastructure are available to all who wish to benefit.
* Intellectual capital management (ICM) software enables users to transfer know-how into corporate policy and procedure, thereby leveraging expertise by making it available to support business practices as needed.
You may well say that all decision makers use information to solve problems, even if they don't use fancy terms like "knowledge leveraging" to describe it.
The now vacated circuit court decision was also notable for its view that the hospital had engaged so-called "monopoly leveraging," an independent violation of Section 1.
Based on its review of available leveraging data and interviews with HUD and Treasury officials, GAO found that the leverage measures the agencies reported for the selected programs were based on incomplete data and thus did not capture the actual extent of leveraging in the programs.
"By leveraging industry-proven technologies such as Ethernet, TCP/IP and SCSI, iSCSI is positioned to become an effective means for companies to deploy lower cost networked storage," said Brad Nisbet, storage program manager at IDC.
Leveraging clustering's industry-proven, dynamic adaptation, storage can be dynamically reconfigured to meet changing business drivers in real time--without business disruption.