levator

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Related to levators: Levatores costarum

levator

 [lĕ-va´ter] (L.)
1. a muscle that elevates an organ or structure.
2. an instrument for raising depressed osseous fragments in fractures.

le·va·tor

(le-vā'tŏr, tōr), [TA]
1. A surgical instrument for prying up the depressed part in a fracture of the skull.
2. One of several muscles with an action to raise the part to which it inserts.
[L. a lifter, fr. levo, pp. -atus, to lift, fr. levis, light]

levator

/le·va·tor/ (le-va´tor) pl. levato´res  
1. a muscle that elevates an organ or structure.
2. an instrument for raising depressed osseous fragments in fractures.

levator

(lə-vā′tər)
n. pl. levatores (lĕv′ə-tôr′ēz)
1. Anatomy A muscle that raises a bodily part.
2. A surgical instrument for lifting the depressed fragments of a fractured skull.

levator

[livā′tər] pl. levatores
Etymology: L, levare, to lift up
1 a muscle that raises a structure of the body, as the levator ani raises parts of the pelvic diaphragm.
2 a surgical instrument used to lift depressed bony fragments in fractures of the skull and other bones.

le·va·tor

(lě-vā'tŏr) [TA]
1. A surgical instrument for prying up the depressed part in a cranial fracture.
2. One of several muscles the action of which is to raise the part into which it is inserted.
[L. a lifter, fr. levo, pp. -atus, to lift, fr. levis, light]

levator

1. Any muscle that acts to raise a part of the body.
2. An elevator. A surgical instrument used to prize up a depressed piece of bone as after a fracture of ZYGOMA or skull.

abductor

or

levator

any muscle that moves a limb away from the body An example of an abductor is the abductor pollicis, which moves the thumb outward. Compare ADDUCTOR.

levator

muscle whose action elevates tissue or part into which it inserts

le·va·tor

(lě-vā'tŏr) [TA]
1. A surgical instrument for prying up the depressed part in a fracture of the skull.
2. One of several muscles with an action to raise the part to which it inserts.
[L. a lifter, fr. levo, pp. -atus, to lift, fr. levis, light]

levator

pl. levatores [L.]
1. a muscle that elevates an organ or structure, e.g. the levator labii muscle.
2. an instrument for raising depressed osseous fragments in fractures.
References in periodicals archive ?
The levator mandibulae muscles shift inferior to the eye at stage 42, and by stage 44 they originate from the anterior surface of the otic capsule.
It is theorized that when the levator ani muscle loses tone it drops form a horizontal to a semi vertical position, causing a widened or open genital hiatus that predisposes the pelvic viscera to prolapse.
Year-round, sitting for long periods with poor posture--hunched over a desk, for example--causes both levator scapulae to work almost continuously, which can cause them to become sore.
D) 4-day larva, anterior view, illustrating musculature connecting the apical organ to chaetal sac around the digestive system or dorsal levators (dl), and cell outlines and muscles running through the primary ciliated band and secondary ciliated band (scb); cell nuclei are highly concentrated within the ciliated bands; projection of 123 confocal sections, 0.
A retrospective study of 987 women referred to a pelvic pain clinic at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, for chronic pelvic pain, found levator ani tenderness in 22% and piriformis tenderness in 13% of the 942 of patients evaluated for those conditions.
Tu said there remains a need for a semiquantitative test to diagnosis piriformis and levator ani tenderness.
1,2 The basic etiology of ptosis is weakness of either of two elevators of the upper lid that include levator palpebrae superioris and muller muscle.
1###Overlapping area of levator Labii superioris alaeque nasi and levator labii superioris
levator function as determined by the amount of excursion of the upper eyelid with the brow fixed (normal: 12 to 17 mm); and
19) Muscle flexibility of the levator scapula was measured by having the subject sit in a mid-back height chair with the operator verbally assisting them into the ideal postural alignment, as stated by Kendall et al.
Tu said there remains a need for a semiquantitative test to diagnose piriformis and levator ani tenderness.