levator

(redirected from levator muscles)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

levator

 [lĕ-va´ter] (L.)
1. a muscle that elevates an organ or structure.
2. an instrument for raising depressed osseous fragments in fractures.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

le·va·tor

(le-vā'tŏr, tōr), [TA]
1. A surgical instrument for prying up the depressed part in a fracture of the skull.
2. One of several muscles with an action to raise the part to which it inserts.
[L. a lifter, fr. levo, pp. -atus, to lift, fr. levis, light]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

levator

(lə-vā′tər)
n. pl. levatores (lĕv′ə-tôr′ēz)
1. Anatomy A muscle that raises a bodily part.
2. A surgical instrument for lifting the depressed fragments of a fractured skull.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

le·va·tor

(lě-vā'tŏr) [TA]
1. A surgical instrument for prying up the depressed part in a cranial fracture.
2. One of several muscles the action of which is to raise the part into which it is inserted.
[L. a lifter, fr. levo, pp. -atus, to lift, fr. levis, light]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

levator

1. Any muscle that acts to raise a part of the body.
2. An elevator. A surgical instrument used to prize up a depressed piece of bone as after a fracture of ZYGOMA or skull.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

abductor

or

levator

any muscle that moves a limb away from the body An example of an abductor is the abductor pollicis, which moves the thumb outward. Compare ADDUCTOR.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

le·va·tor

(lě-vā'tŏr) [TA]
1. A surgical instrument for prying up the depressed part in a fracture of the skull.
2. One of several muscles with an action to raise the part to which it inserts.
[L. a lifter, fr. levo, pp. -atus, to lift, fr. levis, light]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, a series of investigations conducted by Tachimura and his associates (Tachimura, Hara, & Wada, 1995; Tachimura, Nohara, Hara, & Wada, 1999; Tachimura, Nohara, & Wada, 2000; Tachimura, Nohara, Fujita, Hara & Wada, 2001) found that levator muscle activity was typically lower when a speech appliance was in place as compared to removal or modification of the appliance.
"I find this is reproducible on palpation of the levator muscles," said Dr.
The levator muscles, which are vertical muscles within the lips, lift your upper lip and swing it forward and out.
When levator muscles weaken and increasing force is placed on the connective tissue supports, the anterior wall may be the first compartment to fall.

Full browser ?