levator

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Related to levator muscle: Levator ani muscle, Levator scapulae muscle

levator

 [lĕ-va´ter] (L.)
1. a muscle that elevates an organ or structure.
2. an instrument for raising depressed osseous fragments in fractures.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

le·va·tor

(le-vā'tŏr, tōr), [TA]
1. A surgical instrument for prying up the depressed part in a fracture of the skull.
2. One of several muscles with an action to raise the part to which it inserts.
[L. a lifter, fr. levo, pp. -atus, to lift, fr. levis, light]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

levator

(lə-vā′tər)
n. pl. levatores (lĕv′ə-tôr′ēz)
1. Anatomy A muscle that raises a bodily part.
2. A surgical instrument for lifting the depressed fragments of a fractured skull.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

le·va·tor

(lě-vā'tŏr) [TA]
1. A surgical instrument for prying up the depressed part in a cranial fracture.
2. One of several muscles the action of which is to raise the part into which it is inserted.
[L. a lifter, fr. levo, pp. -atus, to lift, fr. levis, light]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

levator

1. Any muscle that acts to raise a part of the body.
2. An elevator. A surgical instrument used to prize up a depressed piece of bone as after a fracture of ZYGOMA or skull.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

abductor

or

levator

any muscle that moves a limb away from the body An example of an abductor is the abductor pollicis, which moves the thumb outward. Compare ADDUCTOR.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

le·va·tor

(lě-vā'tŏr) [TA]
1. A surgical instrument for prying up the depressed part in a fracture of the skull.
2. One of several muscles with an action to raise the part to which it inserts.
[L. a lifter, fr. levo, pp. -atus, to lift, fr. levis, light]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The overall improved cosmetic and functional outcome could be attributed to the fact that NSARP technique allows a safe dissection and preservation of levator muscle as well as the peineal skin bridge.
While satisfactory results could be achieved by current blepharoptosis surgical procedures, complications were inevitable due to the unpredictable nature of ptosis surgery.[1],[2],[3] In our modification, the most notable part is to fully release the orbital fat adhesion at first and then remeasure the prolapse distance of the upper eyelid and the function of levator muscle intraoperative in the supine position.
Recession of the levator muscle was done while removing the two implants to induce ptosis and help cover the exposed cornea in these two patients.
Visual acuity for both eyes was 1.0 (20/20), and her levator muscle strength was 12 mm for both eyes.
Two main more-accepted treatments of blepharoptosis are currently available: one was to enhance the levator muscle strength by performing levator muscle shortening (Emsen, 2008) and the second was to perform surgery by enhancing frontalis muscle power via frontalis muscle suspension (Debski et al., 2012).
Is ultrasound evidence of levator muscle "avulsion" a real anatomic entity?
(18,19) Several factors might lead to postoperative ptosis including damage to the levator muscle or aponeurosis, oculomotor nerve damage during preparation, deficit in the volume, and change in the pivots around which levator muscle works.
Congenital blepharoptosis results from a developmental dystrophy of the levator muscle of unknown aetiology.
This is brought about by ligaments and muscles; the levator muscle and its attachment to the lid (the aponeurosis)
Jobe first suggested the placement of a gold weight into the upper eyelid to assist closure by counteracting the normal levator muscle retraction.
Perineal skin bridge and levator muscle preservation in neutral sagittal anorectoplasty (NSARP) for vestibular fistula.
POP is a complex disease that involves many factors including biochemical changes in pelvic connective tissue, morphological changes in anal levator muscle tissue, pelvic nerve pathological changes in the support tissues, estrogen receptor expression, and changes in specific protease-related proteins.[sup][2] However, the development of POP cannot be explained by these factors.

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