leukotriene receptor antagonists

leukotriene receptor antagonists

drugs that block the binding of leukotrienes to cysteinyl leukotriene T1 receptors, thus inactivating the action of leukotrienes.
See also: antileukotriene.

leukotriene receptor antagonists

Drugs that prevent the action of LEUKOTRIENES by blocking their receptors on cell membranes, such as those of smooth muscle. These drugs have a useful dual effect in relaxing the smooth muscle of the air passages (bronchi) and in combatting inflammation in the bronchial linings-both features of ASTHMA. They have also been found useful in hay fever. Examples are montelukast (Singulair) and zafirlukast (Accolate).
References in periodicals archive ?
Further studies with guinea pigs and then primates resulted in the development of leukotriene receptor antagonists, the first new type of asthma treatment for 20 years.
Some asthma agents, such as montelukast, act as either leukotriene-related enzyme inhibitors (arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase) or leukotriene receptor antagonists.
The allergic rhinitis (AR) market has declined very slowly over the past decade, as has it become saturated with relatively efficacious standard therapies, such as antihistamines (AHs), intranasal corticosteroids (INCS), and leukotriene receptor antagonists (LRAs), and has also been facing increasing generic competition.
15 showed that intravenous leukotriene receptor antagonists could produce a 22% improvement in [FEV.
In contrast, sinonasal imaging should not be routine when patients first present with symptoms consistent with allergic rhinitis, and oral leukotriene receptor antagonists are not recommended as first-line therapy, said Dr.
Most commonly it is treated symptomatically along with the drugs such as antihistamines, analgesics, antibiotics, steroids and leukotriene receptor antagonists.
The active ingredient in the drug, Montelukast is in a class of medications called leukotriene receptor antagonists.
Asthma drugs known as leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRAs) have been hailed as easier to use and as effective as conventional treatment with steroid inhalers in two randomized clinical trials, according to a study published in the May 18, 2011 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).
Leukotriene receptor antagonists and 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors are used to treat asthma patients, about 15% of whom are sensitive to cyclooxygenase inhibitors.
Two "pragmatic" studies of leukotriene receptor antagonists in real-world asthma patients fell just short of demonstrating the drugs' equivalence with inhaled glucocorticoids as first-line therapy and with betaagonists as add-on therapy for exacerbations.
The tablets, called leukotriene receptor antagonists, are currently recommended as third or fourth steps in asthma treatment because of the belief that they are less effective.