leukocyturia


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leukocyte

 [loo´ko-sīt]
a type of blood cell that lacks hemoglobin and is therefore colorless. Leukocytes are larger in size and fewer in number than erythrocytes; normally the blood has about 8000 of them per mm3. In contrast to erythrocytes, leukocytes can move about under their own power with ameboid movement. Their chief functions are to act as scavengers and to help fight infections. Called also white cell or corpuscle and white blood cell or corpuscle. adj., adj leukocyt´ic.

Leukocytes may be classified in two main groups: the granular leukocytes are the basophils, eosinophils, and neutrophils, and the nongranular leukocytes are the lymphocytes and monocytes. About 63 per cent of all leukocytes are neutrophils; 2.5 per cent are eosinophils; and the remaining types constitute less than 1 per cent each.

Leukocytes are actively engaged in the destruction or neutralization of invading microorganisms and are quickly transported to the vicinity of infection or inflammation, so that they can move through the blood vessel wall to reach the site of injury. For this reason, their life span in the blood is usually very short. When infection is present their numbers are greatly increased and they also become more mobile and move back and forth between the blood, lymph, and tissues. The granulocytes and monocytes are phagocytic, swallowing or ingesting the foreign particles with which they come in contact. During the process of phagocytosis the phagocytes themselves are destroyed. The two types of lymphocytes involved in immunity are B lymphocytes (B cells), which play a role in humoral immunity, and T lymphocytes (T cells), which are important in cell-mediated immunity. Plasma cells are activated B cells that secrete antibodies. Monocytes are also involved in some immune processes.
Types of leukocytes.
agranular l's nongranular leukocyte.
basophilic leukocyte basophil (def. 2).
eosinophilic leukocyte eosinophil.
granular l's leukocytes containing abundant granules in the cytoplasm, including neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. Called also granulocyte.
neutrophilic leukocyte neutrophil (def. 2).
nongranular l's leukocytes without specific granules in the cytoplasm, including lymphocytes and monocytes. Called also agranular leukocytes.
polymorphonuclear leukocyte any fully developed, segmented granular leukocyte whose nuclei contain multiple lobes joined by filamentous connections, especially a neutrophil.

leu·ko·cy·tu·ri·a

(lū'kō-sīt-yū'rē-ă),
The presence of leukocytes in urine that is recently voided or collected by means of a catheter.
[leukocyte + G. ouron, urine]

leukocyturia

(lo͞o′kə-sī-to͝or′ē-ə)
n.
The presence of white blood cells in the urine.

leukocyturia

[lo̅o̅′kəsītoo͡r′ē·ə]
the presence of white blood cells in the urine.

leu·ko·cy·tu·ri·a

(lū'kō-sī-tyūr'ē-ă)
The presence of leukocytes in urine that has been recently voided or collected by means of a catheter.
[leukocyte + G. ouron, urine]

leukocyturia

leukocytes in the urine.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Leukocyturia in both test series occurred 3 days after infection and was 4.
Comparison of the obtained results demonstrates that in the main series, leukocyturia in animals was reduced from 8.
History and Physical Examination * Subjective History of arthralgias, myalgias, fatigue, oral ulcers, photosensitivity rash * Objective Malar rash, discoid rash, anemia, edema, hematuria, nephrotic syndrome presentation Laboratory Data * Serologic Positive ANA titer (>1:160-1:320) Positive Anti-dsDNA titer Positive Anti-Sm titer Positive Anti-phospholipid titer Decreased complement protein levels (C3, C4) * Urinalysis Proteinuria, albuminuria, leukocyturia, hematuria, granular casts, hyaline casts, red blood cell casts, fatty casts, oval fat bodies * Other renal abnormalities Decreased creatinine clearance, decreased glomerular filtration rate, elevated serum creatinine Renal Biopsy Used as definitive diagnosis and for determining WHO classification (see Table 2)
No published studies to date have investigated the causes of (sterile) leukocyturia in HIV infection.
The association between sterile pyuria and co-morbid TB, STI or other fastidious and opportunistic infections should have been explored by considering the control group of HIV-infected people without leukocyturia presenting with these conditions.
For all samples from tumor patients, significant bacteriuria or leukocyturia as well as the presence of erythrocytes could be excluded except for two G1 tumor samples.
We found that lower platelet count, higher leukocyte count, the presence of tubular cell casts in urine, quantitative hematuria and leukocyturia (Addis count), and nausea were significantly associated with severe acute renal failure (serum creatinine >620 [micro]mol/L) (Table 1).
Similarly, quantitative hematuria, quantitative leukocyturia, and tubular cell casts obtained 1 day (range 0-12 days) after admission to hospital were associated with, but not predictive for, severe renal failure.
After excluding those with leukocyturia, glucosuria, proteinuria, or a positive nitrite result, we were left with 580 of the 744 men (78.
Bacteriuria after bipolar transurethral resection of the prostate: risk factors and correlation with leukocyturia.
Fifteen patients had proteinuria and microhematuria with or without leukocyturia and granular casts, with a negative nitrite reaction.
None of the methods currently available for evaluating hematuria and leukocyturia is perfect.