leukemoid reaction


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leukemoid

 [loo-ke´moid]
having blood counts and sometimes other clinical findings resembling those of leukemia but not due to uncontrolled proliferation of leukocytes.
leukemoid reaction a peripheral blood picture resembling that of leukemia or indistinguishable from it on the basis of morphologic appearance alone, with leukocytosis of varying degrees and increased numbers of immature cells in circulation. It may be seen with infections such as tuberculosis, brucellosis, toxoplasmosis, staphylococcal infections, and streptococcal infections; with inflammatory disorders such as glomerulonephritis, rheumatoid arthritis, liver failure, and diabetic acidosis; with tumors and granulomatous infiltration of bone marrow; and with intoxications such as eclampsia, severe burns, and mercury poisoning.

leu·ke·moid re·ac·tion

(lū-kē'moyd rē-ak'shŭn),
A moderate, advanced, or sometimes extreme degree of leukocytosis in the circulating blood, similar to that occurring in various forms of leukemia, but not the result of leukemic disease; usually, there is a disproportionate increase in the number of forms (including immature stages) in one series of leukocytes, and various examples of myelocytic, lymphocytic, monocytic, or plasmocytic leukemoid reaction may be also indistinguishable from leukocytosis that is associated with certain forms of leukemia. Leukemoid reactions are sometimes observed as a feature of: 1) infectious disease caused by certain bacteria and other biologic agents, for example, tuberculosis, diphtheria, and chickenpox; 2) intoxication of various types, for example, eclampsia, serious burns, and mustard gas poisoning; 3) malignant neoplasms, for example, carcinoma of the colon, of the lung, of the kidney, or of other organs; 4) acute hemorrhage or hemolysis.

leukemoid reaction

(lo͞o-kē′moid)
n.
A moderate, advanced, or sometimes extreme degree of leukocytosis that is similar or possibly identical to that occurring in various forms of leukemia but is due to some other cause.

leukemoid reaction

Pseudoleukemia Hematology
1. Left shift, see there.
2. Benign abnormal polyclonal proliferation of leukocytes, defined as > 25 x 109/L; LRs reflect a normal BM response to trauma, stress, metabolic disease, drugs, inflammation, connective tissue disease, or malignancy, 2º to secretion of CSF, often associated with immaturity of other cell lines Lab ↑ Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase which is ↓ or absent in leukemia, 'left shift' of myeloid series–↑ bands, metamyelocytes, myelocytes, plasma cells, plasmacytoid lymphocytes, toxic granulation, Döhle inclusion bodies, vacuolization–which implies intracellular bacterial phagocytosis.

leu·ke·moid re·ac·tion

(lū-kē'moyd rē-ak'shŭn)
Leukocytosis similar to that occurring in leukemia, but not the result of leukemic disease. Leukemoid reactions are sometimes observed as a feature of infectious disease (tuberculosis, diphtheria), intoxication (eclampsia, mustard gas poisoning), malignant neoplasms, and acute hemorrhage or hemolysis.
Synonym(s): leukaemoid reaction.

leu·ke·moid re·ac·tion

(lū-kē'moyd rē-ak'shŭn)
Leukocytosis similar to that occurring in leukemia, but not the result of leukemic disease. Sometimes observed as a feature of infectious disease (tuberculosis, diphtheria), intoxication (eclampsia, mustard gas poisoning), malignant neoplasms, and acute hemorrhage or hemolysis.
Synonym(s): leukaemoid reaction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Outcome of extremely low birth weight infants with leukemoid reaction. Pediatrics 2005; 116(1):e43-e51.
Transient leukemoid reactions (TLR) are well-documented in the neonatal intensive care unit and have been associated with antenatal corticosteroid usage, perinatal infections, chorioamnionitis, and Down syndrome [1-9] The incidence varies between 1.3% and 15% [1-2, 10-12] however, extreme hyperleukocytosis which is defined as a white blood cell (WBC) count of >100 x [10.sup.9]/L is a rare entity in premature neonates [2].
Neonatal leukemoid reactions are also associated with the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia [1, 12, 13].
The differential diagnosis of CML includes granulocytic leukemoid reactions, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL), and reactive causes of eosinophilia, basophilia, and monocytosis.
A diagnosis of CNL should be made with caution, and only when granulocytic leukemoid reactions and chronic myeloid leukemia have been carefully excluded.[31]