leukemogen


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leukemogen

 [loo-ke´mo-jen]
any substance that produces leukemia. adj., adj leukemogen´ic.

leu·ke·mo·gen

(lū-kē'mō-jen),
Any substance or entity (for example, benzene, ionizing radiation) considered to be a causal factor in the occurrence of leukemia.

leukemogen

/leu·ke·mo·gen/ (loo-ke´mo-jen) any substance which produces leukemia.leukemogen´ic

leukemogen

Any substance or agent pathogenetically linked to leukaemia; i.e., carcinogen.

leu·ke·mo·gen

(lū-kē'mō-jen)
Any substance or entity considered to be a causal factor in the occurrence of leukemia.
Synonym(s): leukaemogen.

leu·ke·mo·gen

(lū-kē'mō-jen)
Any substance or entity (e.g., benzene, ionizing radiation) considered to be a causal factor in the occurrence of leukemia.
Synonym(s): leukaemogen.

leukemogen

any substance that produces leukemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Benzene is clearly a leukemogen in adults (Schnatter et al.
210]Po in human and animal tissues are consistent with a role as a myelotoxicant and leukemogen.
210]Po is equally plausible as a leukemogen in children.
ACA and the other trade associations underscored the importance of "getting the science right," and that an incorrect scientific classification of formaldehyde as a known human leukemogen could lead to undue public anxiety and significant, negative commercial consequences for companies that utilize this chemical.
BACKGROUND: Benzene is an established leukemogen at high exposure levels.
Chromosome-wide aneuploidy study (CWAS) in workers exposed to an established leukemogen, benzene.
Benzene is an established human leukemogen (International Agency for Research on Cancer 1987), and exposure has been associated with various blood disorders (Smith 1996).
Cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of leukemia; benzene, an established leukemogen, is present in cigarette smoke.
The workers were considered to have no other substantial workplace exposures; therefore, the possibility of biased potency estimates due to other leukemogens was small.
Other known or suspected leukemogens are present in cigarette smoke, including urethane (30,35), 1,3-butadiene (32,36), radioactive elements (37,38), N-nitrosodi-n-butylamine (30,39), and styrene (30,40); benzene is therefore unlikely to be independently responsible for all smoking-induced leukemia.
The Pliofilm cohort is well suited to minimize the possible confounding effects of other leukemogens because the industrial process did not involve exposure to other potential carcinogens.
These additional leukemogens may provide synergistic effects as well as independent contributions to smoking-related leukemia mortality.