leukaemia

(redirected from leukaemic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to leukaemic: leukemic

leukaemia

See leukemia.

leu·ke·mi·a

(lū-kē'mē-ă)
Progressive proliferation of abnormal white blood cells found in hemopoietic tissues, other organs, and usually in the blood in increased numbers. Leukemia is classified by the dominant cell type, and by duration from onset to death, which occurs in acute leukemia within a few months in most cases, and is associated with acute symptoms including severe anemia, hemorrhages, and slight enlargement of lymph nodes or the spleen. The duration of chronic leukemia exceeds 1 year, with a gradual onset of symptoms of anemia or marked enlargement of spleen, liver, or lymph nodes.
Synonym(s): leucaemia, leukaemia.
[leuko- + G. haima, blood]

leukaemia

one of several forms of cancer in LEUCOCYTES, resulting in an uncontrolled increase of immature white blood cells in body organs and often in the blood itself This leads to increased susceptibility to infection and anaemia, and to the enlargement of the spleen, liver and lymph nodes.

leukaemia

progressive proliferation of abnormal leukocytes and enlargement of lymphoid tissues (lymph glands, spleen, bone marrow); characterized by anaemia, haemorrhages, increasing exhaustion and susceptibility to infection
  • acute leukaemia leukaemia of <6 months' duration

  • chronic leukaemia leukaemia >12 months' duration

  • granulocytic leukaemia; myelocytic leukaemia; myeloid leukaemia characterized by large numbers of immature and mature granulocytes in tissues, organs and circulating blood

  • lymphocytic leukaemia; lymphoid leukaemia; lymphatic leukaemia leukaemia characterized by enlargement of lymphoid tissues, and increased numbers of lymphocytes in tissues, organs and circulating blood

leu·ke·mi·a

(lū-kē'mē-ă)
Progressive proliferation of abnormal leukocytes found in hemopoietic tissues, other organs, and usually in the blood in increased numbers; classified by dominant cell type, and by duration from onset to death. This occurs in acute leukemia within a few months in most cases, and is associated with acute symptoms including severe anemia, hemorrhages, and slight enlargement of lymph nodes or the spleen. Chronic leukemia lasts over 1 year, with a gradual onset of symptoms of anemia or marked enlargement of spleen, liver, or lymph nodes.
Synonym(s): leucaemia, leukaemia.
[leuko- + G. haima, blood]

Patient discussion about leukaemia

Q. What is Leukemia? My brother's best friend has been diagnosed with Leukemia. What is it? Is it dangerous? Can you recover from it?

A. Leukemia is the general name for four different types of blood cancers. In people with leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. The abnormal cells are leukemia cells. At first, leukemia cells function almost normally. In time, they may crowd out normal white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets. This makes it hard for blood to do its work. After diagnosis, many people with leukemia do survive and live many good, quality years. The relative five-year survival rate has more than tripled in the past 47 years for patients with leukemia. In 1960-63, when compared to a person without leukemia, a patient had a 14 percent chance of living five years. By 1975-77, the five year relative survival rate had jumped to 35 percent, and in 1996-2003 the overall relative survival rate was nearly 50 percent.

Q. What causes Leukemia? How can one get Leukemia?

A. Not all the causes of leukemia are known. However there are some causes that are suspected. Nowadays as the pollution is increasing and use of chemicals in various parts of life has increased, people who come in contact with toxic chemicals, radiations etc. are at greater risk of developing leukemia, hereditary also plays a role at some extent.

Q. Is Leukemia hereditary? My Grandpa died of Leukemia when he was 50. I am worried that it might be hereditary. Is it?

A. Overall leukemia is not hereditary but there are rare reports of family clusters, that is, more than one case in a family. Therefore, you should consult your Doctor and tell him about your family's medical history.

More discussions about leukaemia
References in periodicals archive ?
The benefits of diminishing leukaemic blast count before this procedure are still being debated.
In concert, these genetic mutations, which were concentrated on a tiny number of genes, transformed normal to leukaemic cells.
In the present study, telomerase expression was found to be the most important predictive marker of leukaemic progression.
This is of particular importance in the case of septic and leukaemic patients who have elevated concentrations of leukocytes.
Okamoto K, Hrai S, Honma M: Extensive leukaemic cell infiltration into skeletal muscles.
But the British team, which also includes scientists from the Anthony Nolan Research Institute laboratories in Hampstead, north London and Nottingham Trent University, is the first to identify the actual peptide produced by leukaemic cells which is targeted by the immune system.
But the British team is the first to identify the actual peptide produced by leukaemic cells which is targeted by the immune system.
The aim is to remove the stem cells, carefully separate them from leukaemic cells, then grow them in the lab.
Eventually the leukaemic cells invade the bone marrow displacing the normal cellular elements, resulting in anaemia.
Along with an elaborate list of ambiguities, the results merely share with us the secret, which is already out in the open, that a person exposed to excessive amounts of radiation is going to end up leukaemic.
This t(9;22) translocation results in the formation of the BCR-ABL fusion gene, which codes for a novel protein tyrosine kinase (TK) that is constitutively activated and therefore leads to increased proliferation of myeloid cells, decreased apoptosis and adhesion, and genetic instability of the leukaemic cells.