leukaemias


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leukaemias

A group of blood disorders in which white blood cells reproduce in a disorganized and uncontrolled way and progressively displace the normal constituents of the blood. The leukaemias are a form of cancer (neoplasia) and unless effectively treated are usually fatal. Death occurs from a shortage of red blood cells (ANAEMIA), or from severe bleeding or from infection. The different types of leukaemia arise from different white cell types and have different outlooks. In most cases the cause is unknown but there are definite associations with radiation, with certain viruses, with some anticancer drugs and with some industrial chemicals such as benzene. Treatment is, at present, primarily by chemotherapy. Removal of the spleen may help. Blood transfusions and antibiotics are commonly required. Other treatments include RADIOTHERAPY, white cell transfusions, bone marrow transfusion after total body radiation, bone marrow removal, treatment to destroy malignant cells and its replacement. Some of these methods are still experimental.
References in periodicals archive ?
Haemoglobin was seen to be less, and anaemia more prevalent in acute leukaemias than the chronic ones.
Leukaemias, as such are now common, and affects all ages and genders.
Material and Methods: Record of all the cases of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) diagnosed during the period of study was retrieved from the laboratory and total number of leukaemia cases were counted.
Conclusion: AML was the commonest leukaemia type, followed by CML, ALL and CLL.
The research was supported by the Medical Research Council, the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Leukaemia and Lymphoma Research, the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Microsoft Research and the Wellcome Trust.
It is concluded that acute leukaemias are more prevalent than chronic leukaemias.
After recent advances and improvement in treatment and prevention in cardiovascular diseases, tumour is an important cause of morbidity and mortality.1 The incidence of leukaemia across the world is 1 per 100,000 annually.
The signs associated with feline leukaemia virus can be many and varied depending on the organs affected but often leukaemia positive cats lose weight, become weak, in-appetent and anaemic.
Only 50% of children diagnosed with MLL leukaemia survive longer than two years after receiving standard therapy.
Dr Cooke explained that previous research has shown kids who develop leukaemia tend to undergo changes to their DNA while in the womb.
WORLD-LEADING scientists at a new research centre in Scotland will have a cure for a key form of leukaemia within 10 years.
A total of 500 cells of WBC were counted and blasts cells over 20% are regarded as acute leukaemias. Then whole blood or aspirate samples were prepared by cell Stain-Lyse-Wash method for immunofluorescence staining with different antibodies which were conjugated with fluorochromes (i.e.