leucoencephalopathy


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Related to leucoencephalopathy: Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

leu·ko·en·ceph·a·lop·a·thy

(lū'kō-en-sef'ă-lop'ă-thē)
White matter changes first described in children with leukemia, associated with radiation and chemotherapy injury, often associated with methotrexate; pathologically characterized by diffuse reactive astrocytosis with multiple areas of necrotic foci without inflammation.
Synonym(s): leucoencephalopathy.
[leuko- + G. enkephalos, brain, + pathos, suffering]

leucoencephalopathy

A rare disorder occurring in the late stages of LYMPHOMA or other cancers. Scattered throughout the brain are areas of DEMYELINATION with changes in the supporting (glial) cells characteristic of PAPOVA VIRUS infection. The resulting damage to nerve function causes widespread effects including paralysis, speech and visual defects, DEMENTIA and convulsions and the condition is fatal within a matter of weeks.
References in periodicals archive ?
Retinal arterial abnormalities correlate with brain white matter lesions in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy.
9% each for Toxoplasmosis, Cytomegalovirus (CMV) encephalitis and Progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy as the causes of death among HIV death due to opportunistic infections (Figure 6).
Reversible spongiform leucoencephalopathy after inhalation of heated heroin.
Reversible posterior leucoencephalopathy syndrome in post streptococcal glomerulonephritis.
Alexander disease (fibrinoid leucodystrophy), originally described by Alexander in 1949, (1) is a rare, fatal, nonfamilial leucoencephalopathy caused by astrocyte dysfunction characterised by missense mutation in the genes coding for glial fibrillary acidic protein(GFAP).
8,9 A relationship between cortical blindness and hypertensive encephalopathy, also termed as posterior reversible leucoencephalopathy syndrome, especially in patients with history of hypertension has been suggested.
HIV-associated neuro-cognitive disorder EBV: primary CNS lym-phoma JC virus: PML [not equal to] Prions: spongiform ence- phalopathy Spinal Acute viral HIV-1 vacuolar cord myelitis myelopathy ADEM * HTLV-1 myelopathy * Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis [dagger] Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis [not equal to] Progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy.
Twenty three (47%) patients had TB unrelated causes (toxoplasmosis, cryptococcal meningitis, septicaemia, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, acute gastroenteritis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, myocardial infarction, lactic acidosis, progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy, and hepatorenal syndrome) and their baseline median CD4 count was 96 cells/[micro]l (IQR: 50-231).
Several studies addressed the effectiveness of treatment with natalizumab and the risk of progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML) which increases at least up to 3 years of treatment and is of the order of one in 1000.
Guillain Barre syndrome, myocardial dilatation, exacerbation of JC virus progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy, leprosy, Kaposi's sarcoma, cytomegalovirus, Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP), opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome, toxoplasmosis and other entities have been reported in adults and in children.
Concomitant progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy and primary central nervous system lymphoma expressing JC virus oncogenic protein, large T antigen.
virus" until late in the paper; instead, in the title and summary it is referred to as a "'papova-like' virus associated with progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy.