leucocytes


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Related to leucocytes: Lymphocytes, Neutrophils, White blood cells

leucocytes

the white blood cells (WBC). All types are involved in body defences, e.g. as phagocytes or producers of antibodies. Unlike red blood cells, they are nucleated, aerobic and move freely between the blood and tissue fluids. Of a total white cell count of 5 - 10 × 103 per mm3, more than 50% are neutrophils, which increase in number with many common infections (leucocytosis). These together with the much smaller numbers of basophils and eosinophils have a multilobed nucleus and contain granules with different staining properties. About 35% of WBC are lymphocytes with a major role in immunity. Less numerous, but largest, are the circulating monocytes equivalent to macrophages in the tissues. See also blood cells, lymphatic system. See fig overleaf .
References in periodicals archive ?
The lack of differences in the leucocyte profiles betwen the individuals with and without the leg abnormalities is unexpected, given the functions of the various leucocytes and nature of the pathogen.
Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for the leucocyte esterase test combined with the nitrite dipstick test.
The data obtained from leucocytes count, neutrophil functions were analyzed by independent t-test for comparison of mean values between two groups.
In other words, the serum sodium levels were negatively correlated with acute phase reactants including leucocyte count, the percentage of neutrophils and CRP (Table 3).
Short chain RNA fragments as promoters of leucocyte and platelet genesis in animals depleted by anti-cancer drug.
Reliable and very sensitive flow-cytometric method for counting low leucocyte numbers in platelet concentrates.
Leucocytes, lymphocytes, activation parameters and cell adhesion molecules in middle-distance runners under different training conditions.
Leucocytes were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), blood and pulmonary parenchyma at 24 h after the last ovalbumin challenge.
The improved processing capacity of computers combined with high resolution digital imaging technology has allowed for the development of systems which can pre-classify haematological cells, mostly leucocytes (1).
They may look like characters in a stalk-and-slash film but the folks above are representing sperm being attacked by leucocytes in the uterus.
The pathognomonic features of DHF are capillary leakage, cerebral oedema, increased haematocrit, thrombocytopoenia and altered number and functions of leucocytes.