lethargy


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lethargy

 [leth´er-je]
1. a lowered level of consciousness marked by listlessness, drowsiness, and apathy.
2. a condition of indifference. adj., adj lethar´gic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

leth·ar·gy

(leth'ăr-jē),
Relatively mild impairment of consciousness resulting in reduced alertness and awareness; this condition has many causes but is ultimately due to generalized brain dysfunction.
[G. lēthargia, drowsiness]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lethargy

(lĕth′ər-jē)
n. pl. lethar·gies
1.
a. A lack of energy or vigor; sluggishness.
b. A lack of interest or enthusiasm; apathy: held a pep rally to shake the students out of their lethargy.
2. Medicine An abnormal state of drowsiness, as caused by disease or drugs.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

lethargy

Neurology A level of consciousness characterized by ↓ interaction with persons or objects in the environment; sluggishness, abnormal drowsiness, stupor
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

leth·ar·gy

(leth'ăr-jē)
A state of deep and prolonged unconsciousness, resembling profound slumber, from which one can be aroused but into which one immediately relapses.
[G. lēthargia, drowsiness]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lethargy

An abnormal state of apathy, sleepiness, drowsiness or lack of energy. Lethargy may be due to organic brain disease or to DEPRESSION. In Greek mythology the river Lethe flowed through Hades and the dead were required to drink its water so as to forget their past lives.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

leth·ar·gy

(leth'ăr-jē)
Relatively mild impairment of consciousness resulting in reduced alertness and awareness.
[G. lēthargia, drowsiness]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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I strongly recommend keeping a close eye on your dogs following any woodland walks for signs of vomiting and lethargy and get your dog examined by your vet if you are concerned.
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Level of consciousness: conscious -18, lethargy -63, stupor -55, moderate coma -40.
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