Lesion


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Related to Lesion: Hill-Sachs lesion, Skin lesion

lesion

 [le´zhun]
any pathological or traumatic discontinuity of tissue or loss of function of a part. Lesion is a broad term, including wounds, sores, ulcers, tumors, cataracts, and any other tissue damage. They range from the skin sores associated with eczema to the changes in lung tissue that occur in tuberculosis.
Kimmelstiel-Wilson lesion a microscopic spherical hyaline mass surrounded by capillaries, found in the kidney glomerulus in the nodular form of intercapillary glomerulosclerosis.

le·sion

(lē'zhŭn),
1. A wound or injury.
2. A pathologic change in the tissues.
3. One of the individual points or patches of a multifocal disease.
[L. laedo, pp. laesus, to injure]

lesion

/le·sion/ (le´zhun) any pathological or traumatic discontinuity of tissue or loss of function of a part.
angiocentric immunoproliferative lesion  a multisystem disease consisting of invasion and destruction of body tissues and structures by atypical lymphocytoid and plasmacytoid cells resembling a lymphoma, often progresssing to lymphoma.
Armanni-Ebstein lesion  vacuolization of the renal tubular epithelium in diabetes.
benign lymphoepithelial lesion  enlargement of the salivary glands with infiltration of the parenchyma by polyclonal B cells and T cells, atrophy of acini, and formation of lymphoepithelial islands.
Blumenthal lesion  a proliferative vascular lesion in the smaller arteries in diabetes.
central lesion  any lesion of the central nervous system.
Ghon's primary lesion  Ghon focus.
Janeway lesion  a small erythematous or hemorrhagic lesion, usually on the palms or soles, in bacterial endocarditis.
primary lesion  the original lesion manifesting a disease, as a chancre.

lesion

(lē′zhən)
n.
Any of various pathological or traumatic changes in a bodily organ or tissue, including tumors, ulcers, sores, and wounds.
tr.v. le·sioned, le·sioning, le·sions
To cause a lesion to form on or in.

lesion

[lē′zhen]
Etymology: L, laesus, an injury
1 a wound, injury, or pathological change in body tissue.
2 any visible local abnormality of the tissues of the skin, such as a wound, sore, rash, or boil. A lesion may be described as benign, cancerous, gross, occult, or primary.

lesion

(1) Any pathological or traumatic discontinuity of tissue or loss of function of a part; a wounded or damaged area; an anatomic or functional tissue defect; an area of abnormal tissue change.
 
(2) A nebulous, nonspecific term used by a doctor when discussing a lump or bump with a patient.

lesion

 Medtalk
1. A wounded or damaged area; an anatomic or functional tissue defect; an area of abnormal tissue change.
2. A nebulous nonspecific term used by a physician when discussing a lump or bump with a Pt. See Mass.

le·sion

(lē'zhŭn)
1. A wound or injury.
2. A pathologic change in the tissues.
3. One of the individual points or patches of a multifocal disease.
[L. laedo, pp. laesus, to injure]

lesion

A useful and widely used medical term meaning any injury, wound, infection, or any structural or other form of abnormality anywhere in the body. Doctors would be at a loss without this term, but it is commonly wrongly regarded by lay people as implying some specific condition such as an adhesion. The word is derived from the Latin laesio , an attack or injury.

lesion

a localized area of diseased tissue.

Lesion

Any visible, local abnormality of the tissues of the skin, such as a wound, sore, rash, or boil.

lesion

Localized, pathological change in a tissue due to injury or disease.

le·sion

(lē'zhŭn)
1. Wound or injury.
2. Pathologic change in tissues.
3. One of the individual points or patches of a multifocal disease.
[L. laedo, pp. laesus, to injure]

lesion

any pathological or traumatic discontinuity of tissue or loss of function of a part. Lesion is a broad term, including wounds, sores, ulcers, tumors, cataracts and any other tissue damage. They range from the skin sores associated with eczema to the changes in lung tissue that occur in tuberculosis.
Enlarge picture
Terms describing distribution of lesions. By permission from Slauson DO, Cooper BJ, Mechanisms of Disease: A Textbook of Comparative General Pathology, Mosby, 2001

target lesion
see target lesion.
References in periodicals archive ?
11) The triage amalgamated dermatoscopic algorithm (TADA) method--in which clinicians first decide whether a lesion could be malignant--was shown to significantly increase the number of correct diagnoses ofbenign lesions.
7) study, fibrocystic disease was the commonest lesion to be associated with atypical ductal hyperplasia comprising of about 13 cases (30.
Classification of oral pathological lesion according to their appearance, nature and origin is very important to reach to the correct diagnosis and eventually treatment.
However a study described sensitivity and specificity of 64% and 69% in detecting neoplastic lesion using NAA/Cr with a significant p value.
We can then directly compare the relative stiffness of a lesion based on its elastic properties in relation to the surrounding tissue.
A pathologic fracture associated with a benign lesion would also have a periosteal new bone or callus formation.
For 12 of these 61 incidental skin cancers (20%), the index lesion had been immediately ruled out as nonmalignant.
When confronted with an unknown lesion, the clinician could easily review the presented information to produce a dental hygiene diagnosis.
1) We were able to completely excise the lesion in our patient without causing any substantial cosmetic and functional deficit.
Lucchinetti and other researchers are now trying to find non-invasive ways for identifying lesion patterns.
The physical examination revealed a healthy-appearing 50-year-old male with no medical concerns other than the skin lesion.
Untreated, the lesions progress to cervical cancer in a small percentage of women.