lese


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lese

verb A back-formation from the noun lesion, meaning to cause a lesion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Siam and Kritsana were also under police investigation for lese majeste, the rights group said.
Samphy's was the second high-profile lese majeste case last year, following the government's March 2018 amendment to the law which criminalised any 'word, gesture, writing, picture or other media which affects the dignity of the individual [the King]'.
Cambodia's lese majeste law was unanimously adopted by parliament in February last year.
[beaucoup moins que] Aucun metier n'a ete lese [beaucoup plus grand que], a assure le president du comite technique.
Following the decision yesterday by the Bangkok Military Court to postpone a decision on whether to indict Sulak Sivaraksa, on charges of lese majeste for comments he made about a battle in 1593, James Gomez, Amnesty International's Director of Southeast Asia and the Pacific, said:
Since 2002, industry veterans Bill Lese and Neil Suslak at Braemar Energy Ventures have been focused exclusively on making investments in innovative, transformational energy and energy related technology companies that generate competitive solutions which address the most pressing issues the industry is facing.
Criticism of the monarch, the regent or the heir, known by the French term lese majeste, is a crime that carries a jail sentence of up to 15 years in Thailand.
Bangkok, Muharram 12, 1437, Oct 25, 2015, SPA -- A Thai man facing lese majeste charges was found hanged in his cell at a military facility in Bangkok, the department of corrections said Sunday.
Speaking today (11 Aug) to reporters in Geneva, Human Rights Office spokesperson Ravina Shamdasani said, "We are appalled by the shockingly disproportionate prison terms handed down over the past few months in lese majeste cases in Thailand.
Established in 2012 by Ms Blair and US cofounder Gail Lese, the company underwent rapid expansion and had aimed to open 100 clinics across the UK.
Thailand's lese majeste law is the world's harshest, carrying a punishment of three to 15 years in jail for anyone who defames, insults, or threatens the monarchy.
When the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) launched a series of "LESE [Learn, Educate, Self-correct and Enforce] examinations" last year, one of its intentions was to discover trends in compliance failure among qualified retirement plans.