lepromin


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lepromin

 [lep´ro-min]
a repeatedly boiled, autoclaved, gauze-filtered suspension of finely ground lepromatous tissue and leprosy bacilli, used in the skin test for tissue resistance to leprosy.

lep·ro·min

(lep'rō-min),
An extract of tissue infected with Mycobacterium leprae used in skin tests to classify the stage of leprosy.
See also: lepromin reaction, test.

lepromin

/lep·ro·min/ (lep´rah-min) a repeatedly boiled, autoclaved, gauze-filtered suspension of finely triturated lepromatous tissue and leprosy bacilli, used in the skin test for tissue resistance to leprosy.

lep·ro·min

(lep'rō-min)
An extract of tissue infected with Mycobacterium leprae used in skin tests to classify the stage of leprosy.
See also: test

lepromin

tissue extract infected with Mycobacterium leprae , used in classification of Hansen's disease
References in periodicals archive ?
For the diagnosis of the disease and follow up of patients, different laboratory methods are employed like the smear, the biopsy, and the lepromin.
1) Pregnancy or breast feeding; 2) Smear negative and lepromin positive [but smear negative and lepromin negative were included]; 3) History of pulmonary tuberculosis, and/or other systemic conditions such as cancer, diabetes, hypertension, renal, hepatic or cardiac diseases; 4) HIV positivity or symptoms suggestive of HIV infection such as recurrent infection.
16) The lepromin test, on the other hand, measures the potential of an individual in building up granulomatous response to the mixture of M.
In this timing set, HIV infection before leprosy, cellular immune response represented by lepromin reaction, lymphoproliferation and INF-gamma release were relatively affected in both lepromatous and tuberculoid forms.
Effect of levamisole therapy on lepromin reaction in lepromatous leprosy cases.
4) These evolving classifications were based on clinical features with some support from histological and prognostic features and lepromin testing.
A nerve biopsy and lepromin test would be required to know the exact location of these patients in the spectrum.
18) In a study on lepromin responsiveness, Leiker reported that not all lepromatous patients are completely anergic to lepromin, as a weak response to lepromin had been observed in many such cases and it seemed that the diffuse lepromatous variety was the only truly anergic type of leprosy.
Alcais and coworkers (2000) showed that NRAMP1 was linked to lepromin reaction, (45) whereas another group worked with the microsatellite of the promoter region and found that a combination between some genotypes and the lepromin negative reaction could contribute to susceptibility.