leper


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leper

 [lep´er]
a person with leprosy; a term now in disfavor.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lep·er

(lep'ĕr), Negative or pejorative connotations of this word may render it offensive in some contexts.
A person who has leprosy.
[G. lepra]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

leper

(lĕp′ər)
n.
1. A person affected by leprosy.
2. A person who is avoided by others; a pariah.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

lep·er

(lep'ĕr)
A person who has leprosy.
[G. lepra]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

leper

A person suffering from leprosy (HANSEN'S DISEASE).
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- The 2011 Turin International Book Fair in Italy displayed an Italian version of the book 'Pig's Bone and Leper's Hands' written by Mostafa Mastur, a prominent Iranian author.
Of around 800 medieval hospitals in the country, 200 were for lepers. Newcastle's Magdalene leper hospital was where the Haymarket now stands, with the remains of its buildings being cleared when St Thomas Church was built in the 19th Century.
" The term ' leper' is not appropriate in modern times.
Local people tended to keep their distance, not only because they were afraid of catching the skinrotting disease but also because of the 'fearful stench' that wafted out from the tiny huts where the lepers lived.
Banishment to a leper colony could be a "life sentence" and in Chapter Four, Edmond examines some of the places to which sufferers were sent in the late 1880s to mid-twentieth century.
The Colony is a history of the large leper colony from its inception in 1866 up through the present.
Naaman was healed despite himself, in stark contrast to the leper who approaches Jesus in Mark's gospel.
The "heretic and the leper find themselves on the outside because of the philosophical dangers they pose to the community, threatening to undermine its core beliefs, while the convert reinvigorates those beliefs" (p.
Maybe that's what my angel wrapped in toilet paper was trying to tell me that night so many years ago: If we can spot the Messiah among the lepers, if we can see beyond ourselves into this beautiful, holy, horrible world, if we can just stop long enough to hear the cries of those who need our help, then we will be able to save the world.
The instruments set the scene with chords in a walking rhythm at the beginning, reflecting the heavy footsteps of the Abbe carrying the leper on his back.
On his way to Jerusalem, Jesus meets 10 lepers. They're excluded from the community because of the condition of their skin and extremities--could be from melanoma, or ache, or plantar warts, or actual leprosy.
They go their way, but, unlike the leper who returned to Jesus, they do not go glorifying God and giving praise for the wonder of God's blessed rule, which they have experienced in their mortal flesh.