lemniscus


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fillet

 [fil´et]
1. a loop, as of cord or tape, for making traction during surgery.
2. in the nervous system, a long band of nerve fibers.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lem·nis·cus

, pl.

lem·nis·ci

(lem-nis'kŭs, -nis'ī), [TA]
A bundle of nerve fibers ascending from sensory relay nuclei to the thalamus.
Synonym(s): fillet (1)
[L. from G. lēmniskos, ribbon or fillet]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lemniscus

(lĕm-nĭs′kəs)
n. pl. lem·nisci (-nĭs′ī′, -nĭs′kī′, -nĭs′kē) Anatomy
A bundle or band of sensory nerve fibers.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

lemniscus

(1) Lateral lemniscus; lemniscus lateralis [NA6].
(2) Medial lemniscus; lemniscus medialis [NA6].
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

lem·nis·cus

, pl. lemnisci (lem-nis'kŭs, -kī) [TA]
A bundle of nerve fibers ascending from sensory relay nuclei to the thalamus.
Synonym(s): fillet (1) .
[L. from G. lēmniskos, ribbon or fillet]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lemniscus

A bundle of nerve fibres in the brain or spinal cord.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The latencies of the peaks that are generated in the CN and the lateral lemniscus are shorter than the ABR.
eP I and eP II of EABR wave were generated in the CN and contralateral lateral lemniscus. Numerous studies have clearly established this species as an essential model for neurophysiologic investigations in conjunction with sophisticated behavior.
Wave I is generated in the peripheral auditory pathway [8], and Waves III and V are believed to arise in the cochlear nuclei and lateral lemniscus, respectively [9].
Wave V has been attributed to activity in the contralateral lateral lemniscus, which terminates in the inferior colliculus [9, 24, 27].
The most promising approaches to treatment in the literature include nerve stimulation techniques that activate central disinhibitory processes (TENS, Epidural spinal cord stimulation), (36,37) deep brain stimulation of the lateral thalamus and medial lemniscus (38,39) and functional return of joint motion of the involved limb (physical and occupational therapy, manipulation).
* Wave IV--from superior olivary nucleus / lateral lemniscus
From the posterior columns, these nerve fibers synapse at the level of the dorsal column nuclei entering the medial lemniscus. From here, they ascend to the level of the thalamus where they again synapse to eventually terminate at the sensory cortex.
Laboratory and clinical evidence now suggest the following wave origins: (1) auditory nerve; (2) cochlear nucleus; (3) superior olivary complex; (4) midbrain, possibly nucleus of the lateral lemniscus; (5) inferior colliculus; (6) medial geniculate body; and (7) possibly auditory radiation from the thalamus to temporal cortex.