leishmanin

leishmanin

 [lēsh´mah-nin]
a suspension of killed leishmania promastigotes; used in a skin test for cutaneous leishmaniasis.
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Assessment of interferon-[gamma] levels and leishmanin skin test results in persons recovered for leishmaniasis.
In the diagnosis of CL, Leishmanin Skin Test (LST) can be used in order to measure delayed hypersensitivity caused by CL [24, 25].
In humans, previous studies have reported that healing of cutaneous leishmaniasis is generally associated with the development of a cellular immune response against the parasite, as well as a positive leishmanin skin test (LST) reactivity [1, 3].
Confirmation of diagnosis for VL in the study patients was carried out by (1) Demonstration of amastigote stage of parasite in aspirate material from lymph node, bone marrow, or spleen using direct light microscopy or (2) Positive serology using Direct Agglutination Test (DAT) at a significant titer of 1:6400 or more, combined with a negative Leishmanin Skin Test (LST).
Overall, 1315 patients (75.9%) had positive leishmanin skin tests.
Twenty-seven studies concerned serological tests (rK39 dipstick or ELISA = 10; DAT = 5; leishmanin skin test = 2, and 10 other serological tests), six were on PCR, four on immunohistochemical staining, one on hematoxylin and eosin histochemical staining, three on microscopy of skin-slit smears, two on culture, and one on histological sections.
The leishmanin skin test (LST) (Montenegro test), an intradermal injection of a suspension of killed promastigotes, measures delayed hypersensitivity reactions and appears to be the only screening test capable of detecting asymptomatic leishmania infections.
The leishmanin skin test, also known as the Montenegro skin test, which is negative during active infection, becomes positive a few weeks to 2 years after cure and remains positive for life.
The Montenegro (leishmanin) test is an intradermal test of delayed hypersensitivity that is highly specific but is not widely available.
The following inclusion criteria were used: residing continuously for more than one year in the study area, no history of symptomatic leishmaniasis, and no contraindications to blood extraction or to administration of a leishmanin skin test (LST).