legionellosis


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to legionellosis: Legionnaires disease, legionella, listeriosis, leptospirosis

legionellosis

 [le″jun-el-o´sis]
disease caused by infection with Legionella species, such as L. pneumophila.

Le·gion·naires' dis·ease

an acute infectious disease, caused by Legionella pneumophila, with prodromal influenzalike symptoms and a rapidly rising high fever, followed by severe pneumonia and production of usually nonpurulent sputum, and sometimes mental confusion, hepatic fatty changes, and renal tubular degeneration. It has a high case-fatality rate; acquired from contaminated water, usually by aerosolization rather than being transmitted from person-to-person.
Synonym(s): legionellosis
[American Legion convention, in Philadelphia in 1976, at which many delegates were so affected]

legionellosis

/le·gion·el·lo·sis/ (le″jin-el-o´sis) disease caused by infection with Legionella pneumophila; see legionnaires' disease and Pontiac fever.

legionellosis

[lē′jənelō′sis]
infection with a species of Legionella, which may cause any of several illnesses, including Legionnaires' disease.

Legionellosis

A disease caused by infection with a Legionella bacterium.
Mentioned in: Legionnaires' Disease
References in periodicals archive ?
With the exception of surveillance for pertussis and legionellosis, the current ABCs case definition includes only culture-proven disease.
Nasogastric tube placement has been shown to be a significant risk factor for healthcare-associated legionellosis in intubated patients; microaspiration of contaminated water was the presumed mode of entry (Blatt et al.
Overview of diagnostic and detection methods for legionellosis and Legionella pneumophila.
Epidemiological investigations of legionellosis are often complicated by the ubiquity of legionellae in nature.
Key words used in the search were Legionella, legionellosis, legionnaires' disease, neurology, neurologic dysfunction, cerebellum, cerebellar dysfunction, and pathology.
The NYC Department of Health reports that it is estimated that approximately 25,000 people develop legionellosis in the United States each year.
Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for TRU Legionella[TM], a new rapid assay for detection of legionellosis.
pneumophila and often cause legionellosis and Pontiac fever, a nonpneumonic, self-limiting illness characterized by influenza-like symptoms (4,5).
Serious infections, including sepsis, due to bacterial, mycobacterial, invasive fungal, parasitic, viral, or other opportunistic infections such as listeriosis, legionellosis and pneumocystis have been reported in patients receiving HUMIRA.
Outbreak of legionellosis associated with a spa pool, United Kingdom.