Legionella


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Related to Legionella: Legionella pneumonia

Legionella

 [le″jun-el´ah]
a genus of gram-negative, aerobic rod-shaped bacteria, the cause of legionellosis. Species include L. micda´dei, the etiologic agent of Pittsburgh pneumonia, and L. pneumo´phila, the etiologic agent of legionnaires' disease and pontiac fever.

Legionella

(lē'jŭn-el'lă),
A genus of aerobic, motile, nonacid-fast, nonencapsulated, gram-negative bacilli (family Legionellaceae) that have a nonfermentative metabolism and require l-cysteine HCl and iron salts for growth; they dwell in water, spread in air, and are pathogenic for humans. Over 40 species have been identified; the type species is Legionella pneumophila.

Legionella

/Le·gion·el·la/ (le″jah-nel´ah) a genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (family Legionellaceae), normal inhabitants of lakes, streams, and moist soil; they have often been isolated from cooling-tower water, evaporative condensers, tap water, shower heads, and treated sewage. L. micda´dei is the causative agent of Pittsburgh pneumonia. L. pneumo´phila is the causative agent of legionnaires' disease.

Le·gion·el·la

(lējŏ-nelă)
A genus of aerobic, motile, non-acid-fast, nonencapsulated, gram-negative bacilli; they dwell in water and are borne by air; pathogenic for humans. The type species is L. pneumophila.

Le·gion·el·la

(lējŏ-nelă)
A genus of aerobic, motile, non-acid-fast, nonencapsulated, gram-negative bacilli; they dwell in water and are borne by air; pathogenic for humans. The type species is L. pneumophila.

Legionella

(lē´jənel´ə),
n a genus of areobic, motile, non acid-fast, nonencapsulated, gram-negative bacilli that have a nonfermentative metabolism. They are water dwelling, airborne spread, and pathogenic for man.
L. pneumophila,
n the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Legionella is a "Gram-negative bacteria" that includes a species called species L.
5-fold in the United States since 2000, and an increasing number of Legionella outbreaks have been reported (2,3).
The identification of exposure in sporadic cases provides a good opportunity to enhance understanding of reservoirs for Legionella in relatively rare sources (6,7).
Here are a few hard-learned lessons from our work on Legionella management plans.
Fortunately, copper and silver ions are always positively charged, while waterborne pathogens like Legionella are negatively charged.
CDC analyzed cases of both diseases from 21 jurisdictions that reported over 90 percent of the infections caused by Legionella bacteria in 2015.
This increased urgency started to build in June 2015, when ASHRAE released the final version of its Legionella standard, ANSI/ASHRAE 188-2015.
The CDC recently released a toolkit to help building owners and managers determine if their facility is at risk for Legionella contamination and if so, how to develop a Water Management Program to reduce Legionella growth and spread.
Legionella pneumophila was first recognized as a causative pathogen of severe pneumonia in 1976 after an outbreak among American Legion conventioneers at Philadelphia's Bellevue Stratford Hotel.
To prevent Legionnaires' disease we must understand the environmental factors that allow Legionella bacteria to survive and reach a susceptible host.
The samples obtained were thereafter analyzed quantitatively for heterotrophic bacteria by utilizing aerobic pour plate employing Plate Count Agar (PCA); for Legionella spp.