legally mandated treatment

legally mandated treatment

Compulsory treatment demanded by the courts even against the personal preferences of the patient. Usually, those commanded to receive particular forms of treatment are prisoners, probationers, the mentally ill (e.g., when a patient is judged to be a menace to his or her own health or the health of others), , those with certain communicable diseases (e.g., tuberculosis, when a patient's refusal of treatment may threaten public health), or those with a history of substance abuse.
Synonym: mandated treatment
References in periodicals archive ?
The second half of the book discusses motivation, as well as cognitive and social factors impacting mental health treatment and also perspectives on particular populations and challenging contexts such as legally mandated treatment. ([umlaut] Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR)
Perceived dangerousness and attributions about the cause of the mental disorder were significant predictors of support for legally mandated treatment. Conservative political ideology was related to attributing the vignette problem to bad character, indirectly affecting support for legal coercion.
Opponents question the therapeutic effectiveness of legally mandated treatment and rightfully argue that research supporting its use in many forms is lacking.
Indeed, these perceptions influence endorsement of legally mandated treatment (Corrigan et al., 2003; Pescosolido et al., 1999).
However, the model explains only 2% of the variance in support for legally mandated treatment. In model 2, dangerousness to others was added as an exogenous variable.
Although mental illness condition had significant direct and indirect effects on support for legally mandated treatment, including it in the model did not significantly alter any of the relationships reported above.