legacy

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legacy

[leg′əsē]
Etymology: L, legatum, bequest
something that is handed down from the past or intended to be bestowed on future generations.

legacy

Informatics
Referring to a computer system with an expired tenure which left behind a “legacy”—usually negative.
References in periodicals archive ?
But this interpretation does not fully explain the phenomenon, since lawyers seem to have worked in the same direction: legacies for pious purposes were, ceteris paribus, more frequent and more valuable in wills made with the assistance of lawyers.
These effects become somewhat clearer if we compare inheritances and legacies (Tables 2 and 3).
This suggests that the Ari[grave{e}]s hypothesis does not offer an exhaustive explanation for the shrinking number and value of charitable legacies in the eighteenth century.
Now, was there any connection between inheritances and legacies of different kinds?
These concerns do not entirely preclude stipulations of religious acts, pious legacies and so on, but such issues are of secondary importance.
In a letter to OCR defending his legacies, Harvard's Fitzsimmons painted a grim picture of a school where the preference did not exist-a place peeved alumni turned their backs on when their kids failed to make the cut.
Fitzsimmons admits Harvard knows of no empirical research to support the claim that diminishing legacies would decrease alumni contributions, relying instead on "hundreds, perhaps thousands of conversations with alumni whose sons and daughters applied.
As the number of applications soared, the rate of admission for legacies began declining from about 90 percent to its current 43 percent.