legacy

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legacy

[leg′əsē]
Etymology: L, legatum, bequest
something that is handed down from the past or intended to be bestowed on future generations.

legacy

Informatics
Referring to a computer system with an expired tenure which left behind a “legacy”—usually negative.
References in periodicals archive ?
Now, was there any connection between inheritances and legacies of different kinds?
These concerns do not entirely preclude stipulations of religious acts, pious legacies and so on, but such issues are of secondary importance.
And we have already observed that the upper classes were more likely than middle and lower class persons to leave legacies to their employees.
For instance, restators continued to favor certain groups of people, but increasingly gave legacies instead of inheritances to them or vice versa.
Concerning legacies, the correlations between gifts for spouses and other recipients are not significant at all.
The results suggest that legacies were made consistently either to all extra-familial groups alike or to none of them.
Thus charitable legacies did not form a group entirely separate from other recipients outside of testators' families, but rather profited from the same kind of altruistic behavior that worked in a favorable way for other recipients as well.
Fitzsimmons admits Harvard knows of no empirical research to support the claim that diminishing legacies would decrease alumni contributions, relying instead on "hundreds, perhaps thousands of conversations with alumni whose sons and daughters applied.
As the number of applications soared, the rate of admission for legacies began declining from about 90 percent to its current 43 percent.