Pool phenomenon

(redirected from leg phenomenon)

Pool phe·nom·e·non

(pūl),
1. in tetany, spasm of both the quadriceps and calf muscles when the extended leg is flexed at the hip; Synonym(s): leg phenomenon, Pool-Schlesinger sign, Schlesinger sign
2. in tetany, contraction of the arm muscles following the stretching of the brachial plexus by elevation of the arm above the head with the forearm extended, resembles the contraction resulting from stimulation of the ulnar nerve. Synonym(s): arm phenomenon
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Pool phe·nom·e·non

(pūl fĕ-nom'ĕ-non)
1. In tetany, spasm of both the quadriceps and calf muscles when the extended leg is flexed at the hip.
Synonym(s): Schlesinger sign.
2. In tetany, contraction of the arm muscles following the stretching of the brachial plexus by elevation of the arm above the head with the forearm extended; resembles the contraction resulting from stimulation of the ulnar nerve.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Pool,

Eugene H., U.S. surgeon, 1874-1949.
Pool phenomenon - in tetany, spasm of the extensor muscles of the knee and of the calf muscles when the extended leg is flexed at the hip; in tetany, contraction of the arm muscles following the stretching of the brachial plexus resembles the contraction resulting from stimulation of the ulnar nerve. Synonym(s): Pool-Schlesinger sign; Schlesinger sign
Pool-Schlesinger sign - Synonym(s): Pool phenomenon
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012