left-brained

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left-brained

(lĕft′brānd′) also

left-brain

(-brān′)
adj.
1. Having the left brain dominant.
2. Of or relating to the thought processes, such as logic and calculation, generally associated with the left brain.
3. Of or relating to a person whose behavior is dominated by logic, analytical thinking, and verbal communication, rather than emotion and creativity.
References in periodicals archive ?
While most of our technological and scientific progress is driven by left-brain thinking, the great advances to come will require that we consciously harness both sides of our brain to greatly improve our cognition.
Yet few in the scientific press doubt that the myth of the left-brain or right-brain personality, or learner, will fade anytime soon, for any number of reasons.
Likewise, the Henry Ford study reveals most left-brain dominant people also use the phone in their right ear, despite there being no perceived difference in their hearing in the left or right ear.
Adding organizational tools like written agendas and outlines as well as analytical activities like worksheets, fact sheets, and discussion will support the linear learning needs and desire for details and data that are characteristic of left-brain learners.
He continues to assert that much left-brain oriented work of analyzing and interpreting data is readily being outsourced to other parts of the world, especially to Asia.
Unlike intuitive "Empathizers" who are good at reading facial expressions and the emotions of others, left-brain "Systemizers" are fascinated by rules, patterns and how things work.
And that means, again, as I said, that the left-brain abilities are still essential, they're just not enough, and the right-brain abilities are the ones that really matter most.
Ever since the rise of modern management techniques, Western civilisations have valued left-brain thinking.
A Whole New Mind focuses on what will happen when the "left-brained" logical thinking required for information technology leaves the U.S.
As left-brain jobs such as programming and accounting shift overseas to low-wage countries, right-brain thinking leads to innovation.
"This made the whole organization more intuitive in its decision-making process." Intuition is important to Nesbitt as it encompasses the "soft" data that's difficult to quantify in the left-brain manner of an accountant.
"Actually, it's a real left-brain, right-brain kind of thing, a kind of radical escape that you need, especially in a business like this.