left brain

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left brain

n.
The cerebral hemisphere to the left of the corpus callosum, controlling activities on the right side of the body, and in humans, usually controlling speech and language functions.
References in periodicals archive ?
While most of our technological and scientific progress is driven by left-brain thinking, the great advances to come will require that we consciously harness both sides of our brain to greatly improve our cognition.
Likewise, the Henry Ford study reveals most left-brain dominant people also use the phone in their right ear, despite there being no perceived difference in their hearing in the left or right ear.
Adding organizational tools like written agendas and outlines as well as analytical activities like worksheets, fact sheets, and discussion will support the linear learning needs and desire for details and data that are characteristic of left-brain learners.
Unlike intuitive "Empathizers" who are good at reading facial expressions and the emotions of others, left-brain "Systemizers" are fascinated by rules, patterns and how things work.
And that means, again, as I said, that the left-brain abilities are still essential, they're just not enough, and the right-brain abilities are the ones that really matter most.
Ever since the rise of modern management techniques, Western civilisations have valued left-brain thinking.
As left-brain jobs such as programming and accounting shift overseas to low-wage countries, right-brain thinking leads to innovation.
Actually, it's a real left-brain, right-brain kind of thing, a kind of radical escape that you need, especially in a business like this.
Even though there is constant communication from one side of the brain to the other, it is believed that most of us have either a right-brain or left-brain dominance, or preference.
Who concocted the myth that humanism is a dry, totally left-brain thing?
As I recall, the twirling was a right-brain activity, while the act of watching the ribbon was a left-brain one.
Leonard Shlain, a chief of laparoscopic surgery at a California medical center and a prolific writer, makes the claim that the advent of alphabetic literacy -- the process of reading and writing -- ushered in the demise of ancient goddess societies and shifted the balance of power from women with their intuitive and holistic right-brain orientation to the more concrete, linear-focused, left-brain men.