left ventricular failure


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left-sid·ed heart fail·ure

inability of the left heart to maintain its circulatory load, with corresponding rise in pressure in the pulmonary circulation usually with pulmonary congestion and ultimately pulmonary edema.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

left ventricular failure

Left heart failure Cardiology CHF due to insufficient output or ↑ filling pressure, resulting in pulmonary vascular congestion Clinical DOE, SOB, exercise intolerance, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, rest dyspnea, chronic cough, nocturnal urination, pulmonary congestion–rales, pleural effusion, wheezing, S3 gallop Risk factors Smoking, obesity, alcohol, high fat, high salt intake Precipitating factors HTN, heart valve disease, congenital heart diseases, cardiomyopathy, myxoma or other heart tumor, ↑ physical activity, hypervolemia, ↑ salt intake, fever or complicated infections, anemia, arrhythmias; hyperthyroidism, renal disease, drugs affecting heart contractility–eg, beta blockers, CCBs, ACE inhibitors, digoxin, diuretics. Cf Right ventricular failure.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

left ven·tric·u·lar fail·ure

(left ven-trik'yŭ-lăr fāl'yŭr)
Congestive heart failure manifested by signs of pulmonary congestion and edema.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

left ven·tric·u·lar fail·ure

(left ven-trik'yŭ-lăr fāl'yŭr)
Congestive heart failure manifested by signs of pulmonary congestion and edema.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A study conducted in Germany on 312 patients undergoing primary PCI, 16.9% developed periprocedural acute left ventricular failure.
Thirty six patients (30.0%) developed KILLIP class-II left ventricular failure, 6 (5%) were with KILLIP class-III and 3 (2.5%) were with KILLIP class-IV.
Acute Left Ventricular Failure due to###35(29.7%)###24(20.3%)###< 0.01
The most frequent etiology for ventilation was acute left ventricular failure (LVF) due to myocardial infarction 59 (50.2%), followed by arrhythmias which included recurrent ventricular tachycardia (VT)/ventricular fibrillations (VF) and fast atrial fibrillations 20 (16.9%)(table-I).
impaired left ventricular function, left ventricular failure, reinfarction, 9 sudden death and arrhythmia (p less than 0.001)9.
Complications in ACS patient with respect to HbA1c: left ventricular failure was the most common complication occurred in patient with ACS followed by cardiogenic shock with increase in glycosylated hemoglobin rate of complication increased.
Left Ventricular Failure: Left ventricular failure was seen in 21 patients (21%) which is consistent with study of Kundu et al (1982) (19)--19.02% and Passey et al (22) (1986)--21%.
Incidence of arrhythmias is 77%, Left ventricular failure was seen in 21 patients (21%) and CVA in 3%.
Prognosis and Conclusion: With early diagnosis and newer conventional left ventricular failure treatments, survival rate is >98% with recovery of heart function (LVEF> 55%).
ACUTE TARGET ORGAN DAMAGE MAY INCLUDE: Hypertensive encephalopathy, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, atherothrombotic brain infarction, acute left ventricular failure, acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina, acute aortic dissection, acute glomerulonephritis and papilledema.
ACUTE LEFT VENTRICULAR FAILURE: Out of 50 patients, 15 (30%) patients had acute left ventricular failure.
TARGET ORGAN DAMAGE: Neurological target organ damage included acute intracerebral hemorrhage 15 patients (30%), subarachnoid hemorrhage in 2 patients (4%), acute ischemic stroke 6 patients (12%), hypertensive encephalopathy in 1 patient (2%), cardiac target organ damage were acute left ventricular failure 14 patients (28%), acute myocardial infarction in 2 patients (6%), unstable angina in 7 patients (14%), and malignant hypertension in 3 patient (6%).

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