leech


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leech

 [lēch]
any of the annelids of the class Hirudinea, especially Hirudo medicinalis; some species are bloodsuckers. Leeches were used extensively to treat various disorders and are still used occasionally to reduce postsurgical venous congestion, as in tissue flaps, grafts, or transplants.

leech

(lēch),
1. A bloodsucking aquatic annelid worm (genus Hirudo, class Hirudinea) sometimes used in medicine for local withdrawal of blood.
2. To treat medically by applying leeches.
[A.S. laece, a physician; a leech, because of its therapeutic use]

leech

(lēch) any of the annelids of the class Hirudinea, especially Hirudo medicinalis; some species are bloodsuckers. Leeches have been used for drawing blood.

leech

(lēch)
n.
1. Any of various chiefly aquatic carnivorous or bloodsucking annelid worms of the class (or subclass) Hirudinea, of which one species (Hirudo medicinalis) was formerly widely used by physicians for therapeutic bloodletting.
2. Archaic A physician.
v. leeched, leeching, leeches
v.tr.
To bleed with leeches.

leech

noun A segmented annelid of fresh water or soil in the tropics and subtropics; classic medicinal leech is Hirudo medicinalis, others include Poecilobdella, Dinobdella, Limnatis, Haemadipsa, Macrobdella Medical uses Remove excess blood from operative field; stimulate capillary ingrowth in reimplanted, traumatically amputated extremities and in plastic surgery; extract hirudin, a potent anticoagulant, and undelineated substances in leech saliva that inhibit tumor spread. See Hirudin, Limnatis nilotica verbTo treat with a leech, to let blood.

leech

(lēch)
1. Any bloodsucking aquatic annelid worm, including those of the class Hirudinea, sometimes used in medicine and plastic surgery for local withdrawal of blood.
2. To treat medically by applying leeches.

leech

1. An annelid worm of the class Hirudinea, some of which are blood-suckers. Leeches were formerly much used to withdraw blood, to reduce HAEMATOMAS and to attempt to treat varicose veins.
2. A facetious term for a medical practitioner.

leech

an aquatic annelid of the order Hirudinea.

leech

(lēch)
A bloodsucking aquatic annelid worm sometimes used in medicine for local withdrawal of blood.

leech

1. any of the annelids of the class Hirudinea, especially Hirudo medicinalis; some species are bloodsuckers, and used for drawing blood.
2. one of the granular bodies in swamp cancer. Called also grains.

equine leech
References in periodicals archive ?
The typical diet food, Leech says it's good for weight-conscious people.
The leech has five pairs of eyes, two cutting-blade jaws, instead of the more typical three, and "the digestive tract has some neat features .
Robert Crispin, collision investigator for West Yorkshire Police, said Mr Leech had set the car to park mode and the handbrake was on.
Alongside his wife Jane, Mr Leech was also involved in rigid lens manufacturing when Norcon Laboratories in Newcastle was established, just at the time that soft lenses took off.
Mr Leech tried to flee, but tripped up - the gunman walked up to him as he lay on the ground and opened fire.
During a promotional visit here for "Downton Abbey,'' Leech was careful to avoid giving away details of the latest season -- which, to the frustration of some viewers, comes to America after it airs in the U.
Leech expert Mark Siddal, at the American Museum of Natural History, New York, said: "Daniela could have picked up this leech from swimming in Vietnam.
Leech did the same on two further occasions before shaking the baby's head from side to side three or four times.
Removal of the leech from the animal is a challenging task.
After documenting the site of lodgment, leech was removed anteriorly from nares or posteriorly from nasopharynx via oral cavity (Figure-1).
Leech therapy is applied on skin diseases, arthritis, chronic headaches and sinusitis.
Henley-in-Arden Parish Council has lost a landmark battle against rebel Councillor Bill Leech after being branded 'dysfunctional' by Stratford District Council.