lecithinase


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Related to lecithinase: lecithinase C

lecithinase

 [les´ĭ-thin-ās″]
an enzyme that splits up lecithin; called also phospholipase.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

phos·pho·lip·ase

(fos'fō-lip'ās),
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of a phospholipid.
Synonym(s): lecithinase
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lecithinase

(lĕs′ə-thə-nās′, -nāz′)
n.
Any of several enzymes that hydrolyze lecithin.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

lecithinase

A nonspecific term for any enzyme that hydrolyses lecithin and other phospholipids.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

phos·pho·lip·ase

(fos'fō-lip'ās)
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of a phospholipid.
Synonym(s): lecithinase.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lecithinase

An enzyme that breaks down lecithin.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

phos·pho·lip·ase

(fos'fō-lip'ās)
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of a phospholipid.
Synonym(s): lecithinase.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Detection, prevalence, purification and characterization of lecithinase of Klebsiella pneumoniae.
(1959) The relation between the activity of a lecithinase and the electrophoretic charge of the substrate.
Biochemical and morphological characterization: The three isolates were Gram positive rods, lecithinase positive, showed haemolytic activity in blood agar and produced spores in oval way.
aureus appear as black colonies demonstrating lecithinase activity as an opaque zone around the colony, encircled by a zone of clearing that is the result of lipase activity.
perfringens is a soil-borne Gram positive bacteria, is hemolytic, and produces the enzyme lecithinase, and is anaerobic.
Different biochemical tests carried such as, fermentation reaction with different sugars, IMViC, H2S, Litmus milk reaction, Gelatin hydrolysis, Motility test, Egg yolk agar (Lecithinase and lipase) (Rahaman et al., 2013).
O2, O7, O8, O14, O17 and O19 have been isolated from different geothermal springs and reported as producer of various thermostable hydrolytic extracellular enzymes such as amylase, protease, cellulase, gelatinase, xylanase, lecithinase and lipase (6,17,40).
Bacterial isolates collected from hot springs were screened for amylase, protease, lipase, gelatinase, cellulose, and lecithinase activity (Figure 4).
perfringens alpha toxin (lecithinase) on lecithin of egg yolk onto enriched egg yolk agar medium which appeared as pearly opalescence zone surround the colonies while this reaction was inhibited by C.
The positive colonies were subjected to biochemical test for identification such as catalase, coagulase, oxidase, indole, methyl red, Voges-Proskauer, Citrate, TSI, stormy clot fermentation, Lecithinase, CAMP tests and sugar fermentation reaction as per Barrow and Feltham (1993).
All isolates were phenotypically identical; they produced broad halos of hemolysis and lecithinase reactions and had positive glucose-1-phosphate acidification test results, reflecting the constitutive activation of the PrfA virulence regulon.