lecithin


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Related to lecithin: Soy lecithin

lec·i·thin

(les'i-thin),
Traditional term for 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines or 3-sn-phosphatidylcholines, phospholipids that on hydrolysis yield two fatty acid molecules and a molecule each of glycerophosphoric acid and choline. In some varieties of lecithin, both fatty acids are saturated, others contain only unsaturated acids (for example, oleic, linoleic, or arachidonic acid); in others again, one fatty acid is saturated, the other unsaturated. Lecithins are yellowish or brown waxy substances, readily miscible in water, in which they appear under the microscope as irregular elongated particles known as "myelin forms," and are found in nervous tissue, especially in the myelin sheaths, in egg yolk, and as essential constituents of animal and vegetable cells.
[G. lekithos, egg yolk]

lecithin

(lĕs′ə-thĭn)
n.
1. Any of various substances containing phosphatidylcholine and a variety of other phospholipids, extracted from soybeans, egg yolks, or other sources and used as emulsifiers in a wide range of commercial products, including foods, cosmetics, paints, and plastics.

lecithin

A phospholipid extracted from soybeans, which is believed to:
(1) Improve memory (based on lecithin’s choline, which is incorporated into acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter); and 
(2) Improve the lipid profile by increasing HDL (“good”) cholesterol and decreasing LDL (“bad”) cholesterol.
 
Although there is little peer-reviewed data either confirming or refuting lecithin’s efficacy for the above indications, it is widely sold in health food for these supposed effects.

lec·i·thin

(les'i-thin)
Traditional term for phospholipids that on hydrolysis yield two fatty acid molecules and a molecule each of glycerophosphoric acid and choline. Lecithins are found in nervous tissue, especially in the myelin sheaths, in egg yolk, and as essential constituents of animal and vegetable cells.
[G. lekithos, egg yolk]

lecithin

any of a group of phospholipids, composed of choline, phosphoric acid, fatty acids and glycerol, found in animal and plant tissues.

lec·i·thin

(les'i-thin)
Lecithin is a yellowish or brown waxy substance, readily miscible in water, in which it appears under the microscope as irregular elongated particles known as "myelin forms"; found in nervous tissue, especially in the myelin sheaths, in egg yolk, and as essential constituents of animal and vegetable cells.
[G. lekithos, egg yolk]
References in periodicals archive ?
The Global De-Oiled Lecithin Market report segments the market by source and application.
Meanwhile, soybean lecithin produced a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the activity of total alkaline proteases, chymotrypsin, trypsin, and lipase compared with larvae fed with diets containing fish oil despite lipid level.
Since CSP contains only 33% Boswellia extract on molar basis, this involved comparison between 150 mg of extract formulated with lecithin and 500 mg of non-formulated extract.
The area shown in blue extends across the binary water/Acid S40P axis, and the region of lecithin concentrations of less than 20% by weight.
(2010) attributed low sperm motility to the higher concentration of lecithin in the extender.
The antioxidant agents (BHT and tocopherol) and emulsifiers (soy lecithin and Triton X-100) were added in adequate amounts (30-100 ppm in relation to the total mass of substrate) at the beginning of the reactions.
Lecithin is known to stabilize emulsions and is used in many food and medical products because of its digestibility and biocompatibility for humans.
To demonstrate the role of gut flora in forming TMAO, human subjects were asked to eat two hard-boiled eggs (a common dietary source of lecithin) and a capsule of labeled lecithin (as a tracer).
Choline is a component of phosphatidylcholine, another phospholipid found in lecithin.
The company announced that investment in a new $10 million is also planned in the UAE for the production of lecithin, an oil by-product used in bakeries and animal feed.
'Think of it as internal skin care with whole-body benefits: lock water back into your cells and you'll look younger and live longer as well as smoothing cellulite.' DIMPLE BUSTER 1 Lecithin Your cell walls are made up mainly of lecithin, plus fats, so upping your levels helps make them water-tight.