learn

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learn

(lĕrn)
To gain knowledge, understanding, or skill through study or practice.
[O.E. leornian]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
And verily, it is no commandment for to-day and to-morrow to LEARN to love oneself.
Of these stories the minstrels used to learn only the outline, and each told the story in his own way, filling it in according to his own fancy.
The learned man from the cold lands--he was a young man, and seemed to be a clever man--sat in a glowing oven; it took effect on him, he became quite meagre--even his shadow shrunk in, for the sun had also an effect on it.
"Oh, you can do them without learning," said Philip; "I never learned drawing."
He hopes that "some scientific widower, left alone with his offspring at the critical moment, may ere long test this suggestion on the living subject." However this may be, he quotes evidence to show that "birds do not LEARN to fly," but fly by instinct when they reach the appropriate age (ib., p.
From the time that I can remember having any thoughts about anything, I recall that I had an intense longing to learn to read.
Though conscious of the difficulty of learning without a teacher, I set out with high hope, and a fixed purpose, at whatever cost of trou- ble, to learn how to read.
"Have you learned anything at Redmond except dead languages and geometry and such trash?" queried Aunt Jamesina.
So necessary is this to the understanding the characters of men, that none are more ignorant of them than those learned pedants whose lives have been entirely consumed in colleges, and among books; for however exquisitely human nature may have been described by writers, the true practical system can be learnt only in the world.
This was the same long-familiar tone his father always took with him, and Seryozha had learned by now to fall in with it.
Moreover, it is necessary to instruct children in what is useful, not only on account of its being useful in itself, as, for instance, to learn to read, but also as the means of acquiring other different sorts of instruction: thus they should be instructed in painting, not only to prevent their being mistaken in purchasing pictures, or in buying or selling of vases, but rather as it makes [1338b] them judges of the beauties of the human form; for to be always hunting after the profitable ill agrees with great and freeborn souls.
Out of this pack-persecution he learned two important things: how to take care of himself in a mass-fight against him--and how, on a single dog, to inflict the greatest amount of damage in the briefest space of time.

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