learning-disabled


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learning-disabled

(lûr′nĭng-dĭs-ā′bəld)
adj.
Having a learning disability: programs for learning-disabled students.
References in periodicals archive ?
It seems likely that including activities that help a learning-disabled student discover symmetry and its relation to the pairing of beats could have a positive effect on developmental music aptitude.
Such strategy instruction is a typical intervention for learning-disabled children; properly applied, it can be effective.
The patient's history was common for a child who is labeled as learning-disabled or dyslexic.
The prevalence is 0.1%-0.8% in the general population, while most surveys of learning-disabled individuals find that 10% are moderately hearing impaired or deaf.
Yet a closer look at how learning-disabled students are actually faring under a variety of school choice programs worldwide suggests that the special education card may not play out exactly as the opponents of market-based education reform are hoping.
Since learning-disabled children appear to be more susceptible to depression (Dwivedi & Varma, 1997), school counselors may need to focus secondary prevention efforts on this population.
But the digital artist has been interested in education since the 1980s, when he worked with severely learning-disabled children at Washington, D.C.'s, Lab School.
Often, children with attention deficit/hyperactive disorder (AD/HD) have been described within the learning-disabled group.
For 18 years, I have been a teacher at a private school for bright, learning-disabled children.
An attributional investigation of performance outcomes for learning-disabled and normal-achieving pupils.
More than 80 percent of all school children in the United States could qualify as learning-disabled under one definition or another, according to University of Minnesota researcher James Ysseldyke.
Sociometric differences between learning-disabled and non-handicapped students: Effects of sex and race.

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