learning theory


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to learning theory: Social learning theory

learn·ing the·o·ry

any of several prominent theories designed to explain learning, especially those promulgated by Pavlov, Thorndike, Guthrie, Hull, Kohler, Spence, Miller, Skinner, and their more modern followers.
See also: conditioning.

learn·ing the·o·ry

(lĕrning thēŏr-ē)
Any of several prominent theories designed to explain learning, especially those promulgated by Pavlov, Thorndike, Skinner, and their followers.
See also: conditioning

learning theory

The theory that learning occurs by application of laws of learning. Learning represents a change in behavior due to practice, education, and experience.
See also: theory
References in periodicals archive ?
Transformative learning theory deals with a learning process in which adults examine their meaning perspectives, via a process of critical reflection (premise reflection), resulting in transformation of such perspectives.
Viability is a key tenet of constructivist learning theory and assumes that knowledge is only important if it helps the individual understand the world around them (vonGlasersfeld, 1991).
Chapters 6 through 9 offer readers an explanation and examples of how online collaborative learning theory (OCL) responds to 21st century requirements and shifting paradigms of instruction and scientific analysis.
Expansive Learning Theory builds on the concepts of learning on a cycle or spiral, commencing with questioning and moving through various stages to consolidation of new and transferable knowledge in a manner resonant with TBLT.
Readings and assignments are built on postformal theory (Sinnot, 2003), contrasted with motivation learning theory (Schunk, 2012).
Some of the propositions in happenstance learning theory may appear revolutionary, but they are just common sense.
Behaviorist learning theory has great influences on e-learning.
Yecke argues that modern practice took root in the 1970s and 1980s as a consequence of "plateau learning theory." This theory, that brain growth slows during the middle-school years, combined with an undue concern for nonacademic considerations to produce the modern middle school.
It was conducted by a gentleman who had limited knowledge of the subject matter or adult learning theory. He ran in at the last minute, after the participants were seated, slapped several transparencies on the overhead (which were typed in single space text), and expected us to read them ourselves.
In more contemporary terminology, this involves the process of career decision making (e.g., Mitchell & Krumboltz's, 1996, social learning theory of career decision making; Peterson et al.'s, 1996, cognitive information processing model; Tiedeman's, 1961, pioneering model of career decision making).
Specifically written for classroom teachers and curriculum developers for grades K through 12 by Martha Kaufedlt (an experienced classroom educator, including the responsibilities of having been the lead teacher and restructuring coordinator for a demonstration brain-compatible school), Teachers, Change Your Bait!: Brain-Compatible Differentiated Instruction explains how teachers can apply brain-compatible learning theory in a practical manner to ensure that no child is truly left behind in the classroom.
Unfortunately, few higher-ed institutions and even fewer K-12 programs share Pepperdine's commitment to constructivism and social learning theory. Most online programs are based on constraints, such as: too few student to justify advanced courses; geographic distance; teacher shortages; mandates squeezing electives out of the school schedule or budget cuts.

Full browser ?