learned treatise


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A standard text or other written authoritative source which may be used as an ‘expert’ in a court of law

learned treatise

Informatics A standard text–eg, Sabiston's Textbook of Surgery or other written authoritative source–eg, Dorland's Medical Dictionary which may be used as an 'expert' in a court of law
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He is, according to friends, writing a learned treatise on why Labour lost the General Election.
But I was amused to read this deadpan comment in the middle of a learned treatise.
His verse has been the subject of hundreds of learned treatise and scholarly analysis down through the centuries.
In light of Wolford's implicit approval of the use of affidavits to establish authoritativeness, the use of affidavits may be the path of least resistance when attempting to use a learned treatise, since even a party's own retained experts will likely be reluctant to call a publication authoritative if they are expected to testify.
If the medical experts agree that the package insert is relied on by physicians, use of the package insert as a learned treatise is appropriate (19).
And then there is the learned treatise, in which the writer reveals a vast knowledge of musical history, the composer, compositional trends and such like, finishing off with a desultory listing of the performers as a kind of tag line.
The court held, inter alia, that the technique instruction manual (that came with the nail and to which the plaintiffs' expert witness alluded in his testimony) was not a learned treatise and thus not entitled to be used in cross examination of the defendants' expert witnesses.
3) Rather, in most jurisdictions, the validity of a learned treatise may be verified by the testimony of any expert or even by judicial notice, and the contents of a treatise can be admitted into evidence as substantive proof on both direct and cross-examination.
704, Law Revision Council Note (1976) ("This section does not provide that the learned treatise is admissible to provide the truth of the contents of the treatise.
Why, they ask, should it be permissible to cite an article in the local newspaper, the Bible, a learned treatise, or a novel by Stephen King, but absolutely prohibited to cite certain words of the justices of the appellate court?
While those learned treatises are being written, More Than I Can Say: Michael Peers--A Memoir adds a layer of warm, personal perspectives on a life lived very much in the public eye.
Due tributes offered (Noko, Benesch), and the examination of the significant role voices intoned but not often heard (Achtelstetter, Isaak, Philip) offer the frame that encompasses learned treatises on questions of sexuality and the erotic (Nessan, Gerle), on the environment (Moe-Lobeda, Rossing), religious interface (Sinn) and facets of the ecumenical wells of the reforming Christian movement (Stortz).