learned helplessness


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learned help·less·ness

(lĕrnd help'les-nes),
A laboratory model of depression involving both classical (respondent) and instrumental (operant) conditioning techniques; application of unavoidable shock is followed by failure to cope in situations in which coping might otherwise be possible.

learned helplessness

[lurnd]
a behavioral state and personality trait of a person who believes that he or she is ineffectual, his or her responses are futile, and control over reinforcers in the environment has been lost. It may be seen in depression.
Animal behaviour A state of apathy or passiveness induced in experimental animals by classic—respondent or operant—instrumental conditioning
Geriatrics A state of over-dependency discordant with the degree of physical and mental disability seen in nursing home patients
Psychiatry A state in which a person attempts to maintain a relationship with another by adopting a helpless, powerless stance

learned helplessness

Geriatric medicine A state of overdependency discordant with the degree of physical and mental disability seen in nursing home Pts Psychiatry A condition in which a person attempts to establish and maintain contact with another by adopting a helpless, powerless stance.

learn·ed help·less·ness

(lĕrnd help'lĕs-nĕs)
A laboratory model of depression involving both classical (respondent) and instrumental (operant) conditioning techniques; application of unavoidable shock is followed by failure to cope in situations where coping might otherwise be possible.

learned helplessness

A state of deep passivity with lack of motivation, cognitive deficit and depression, liable to affect patients trapped in aversive situations such as prolonged inpatient stay or inadequate institutional care. The condition is remediable.

learned helplessness

a state of apathy and hopelessness in which the individual feels unable to affect outcomes, resulting from repeated exposure to uncontrollable situations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hypothesis 1b: Dysfunctional attitudes and learned helplessness will together predict the coping styles of male drug abusers.
Due to links between learned helplessness and depression (Seligman, 1975), participants were screened for depressive tendencies.
Whereas the people who were apathetic mostly held a pessimistic point of view and had developed the feelings of learned helplessness and thought all their efforts will go useless and as a result they had given up all efforts and hopes.
The strategies to rise above the trammels of learned helplessness are articulated below:
In an era where adults with ID are becoming increasingly independent, self-determined, making decisions for themselves, and integrated into mainstream society, perceived control may be still hindered by the learned helplessness they experience as a result from overprotection from parents, caregivers, teachers, or coaches (Frey et al.
Rather than looking for some kind of external assistance, such as luck in a particular color of bail, the low skill participants may have demonstrated a form of learned helplessness (Matute, 1994; Rudski, 2004; Rudski et al.
Learned helplessness and learned resourcefulness: Effects of noncontingent success and failure on individuals differing in self-control skills.
Successful approaches to overcoming learned helplessness engage teachers emotionally, intellectually, and even physically, moving teachers out of their comfort zones and encouraging them to channel their hopes and frustrations into productive action.
But there is also an increasing body of research based on the well-established work of Pavlov's classical conditioning (1927), Skinner's operant conditioning (1953) and Seligman's original Learned Helplessness research (1975), that suggests that much of what we think of as being genetic is, in fact, only learned or conditioned behaviour.
Conceptually-Based Predictors of High-Risk Sex Learned Helplessness and Attributional Style A paucity of research exists with regard to the effects of individual attributional style on increased risk-taking behavior.
Predictions for differences in depression and job search during unemployment in Study 1 will be made using the learned helplessness theory (Abramson, Seligman, & Teasdale, 1978; Peterson & Seligman, 1983) (Hypotheses 1 and 2).