learn

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learn

(lĕrn)
To gain knowledge, understanding, or skill through study or practice.
[O.E. leornian]
References in classic literature ?
It is only, perhaps, when we have learned to hear with our eyes that we know the true joy of books.
Only in that single house, which stood opposite that in which the learned foreigner lived, it was quite still; and yet some one lived there, for there stood flowers in the balcony--they grew so well in the sun's heat
I think my shadow is the only living thing one sees over there," said the learned man.
In the midst of my struggles and longing for an education, a young coloured boy who had learned to read in the state of Ohio came to Malden.
The young man from Ohio who had learned to read the papers was considered, but his age was against him.
When you've learned to laugh at the things that should be laughed at, and not to laugh at those that shouldn't, you've got wisdom and understanding.
I think," said Anne slowly, "that I really have learned to look upon each little hindrance as a jest and each great one as the foreshadowing of victory.
And he learned from Kapitonitch, from his nurse, from Nadinka, from Vassily Lukitch, but not from his teachers.
But White Fang's reprisals did not cease, even when the young dogs had learned thoroughly that they must stay together.
The code he learned was to obey the strong and to oppress the weak.
Most men have learned to read to serve a paltry convenience, as they have learned to cipher in order to keep accounts and not be cheated in trade; but of reading as a noble intellectual exercise they know little or nothing; yet this only is reading, in a high sense, not that which lulls us as a luxury and suffers the nobler faculties to sleep the while, but what we have to stand on tip-toe to read and devote our most alert and wakeful hours to.
His collection is interesting and important, not only as the parent source or foundation of the earlier printed versions of Aesop, but as the direct channel of attracting to these fables the attention of the learned.