petiole

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petiole

 [pet´e-ōl]
a stem, stalk, or pedicle.
epiglottic petiole the pointed lower end of the epiglottic cartilage, attached to the thyroid cartilage.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pe·ti·o·lus

(pe-tī'ō-lŭs), Avoid the mispronunciation petio'lus.
A stem or pedicle.
Synonym(s): petiole
[L. dim. of pes (foot), the stalk of a fruit]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

petiole

(pĕt′ē-ōl′)
n.
Zoology A slender, stalklike part, as that connecting the thorax and abdomen in certain insects.

pet′i·oled′ adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

petiole

the stalk of a leaf, containing vascular tissue which connects with the VASCULAR BUNDLES of the stem. The base of a petiole, where it joins the stem, may have small leaflike structures called STIPULES and axillary buds. see AXIL.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This Mediterranean species is similar to a giant artichoke but is grown for its edible leafstalks rather than flower buds.
bungeanum (Chinese prickly-ash, Sichuan pepper tree), whereas adults were observed also on other green parts of the host plant, such as leafstalks and fruits (Figs.
Vines with tendrils or twisting leafstalks or stems need an open mesh or small diameter poles.
attached to long leafstalks. When in bloom, it is covered in small white starlike flowers, with five petals (deeply divided so it looks like ten).
Never mind that an aspen's leaves are "2 to 6 inches long, with flattened leafstalks." Have you seen how each leaf dances in the breeze?
The plant is grown in hardwood shade and specimens at least three years old with at least two leafstalks eight inches in length should be picked, preferably in the fall.
Description: Soft green foliage with shiny black leafstalks; useful as a filler or accent in smaller bouquets and wedding designs.