lead-time bias

lead-time bias

apparent increased survival time resultant from earlier, more timely, diagnosis.

lead-time bias

Pronounced Leed A bias introduced into a long-term study of the efficacy of a particular therapeutic maneuver–eg, RT or chemotherapy for malignancy; if the disease is diagnosed early–due to a newer or more sensitive diagnostic procedure or technique, the maneuver is viewed as being effective, when in fact the Pt survives 'longer' because his disease was diagnosed earlier. See Will Rogers effect.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lead-time bias "extend[s] the statistical length of a patient's survival without necessarily prolonging the duration of life," according to the late Alvan R.
Another really useful finding is that our methodology allows testing of various biases, such as lead-time bias and pseudo-disease that could explain the profoundly lower mortality.
Researchers opposed to early therapy highlight the side effect profile and often point to the lead-time bias that this represents.