curbside consultation

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An informal and unofficial consultation obtained from a health professional by either a lay person or a fellow health care professional

curbside consultation

Sidewalk consultation An informal and unofficial consultation obtained from a health professsional by either a layperson or a fellow health care professional
Curbside consultation  
Layperson A layperson may 'corner' any physician, seeking an opinion about a medical condition, diagnostic modality, or therapeutic option; this form of consultation is particularly dangerous to the physician offering the opinion, as
1. the physician being cornered may not have expertise in the area–eg, a plastic surgeon being questioned about minutiae related to the complications of chemotherapy.
2. The person may be asking for information about another person–eg, Aunt Gertrude with gallstones, in which case the information being exchanged with the consultant is confusing–for both the consultant and the surrogate consultee and/or becomes complete gibberish by the time that Aunt Gertrude recieves the 2nd-hand consultation, and.
3. The consultant may be liable for a lawsuit for misinformation that a damaged party may allege was provided
Physician A physician may ask a colleague in another specialty for the best method for managing a particular clinical problem NEJM 1995; 332:474c   
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curbside consultation

(kŭrb′sīd″)
An informal discussion between two health care professionals about the likely causes of a patient's illness, the natural history of the disease, possible interventions, remedies, or treatments, etc. Unlike a formal consultation, it does not involve a detailed history, physical examination, or review of laboratory and radiographic studies.
References in periodicals archive ?
The bishops clarified, however, that the homily is always reserved for ordained ministers and that no bishop can authorize a layperson to preach at this time during the Mass.
For example, laypersons concerned with imaging system legalities will often hope to locate a case decision on legality of magneto-optical imaging systems used by power utilities in the State of New York to image personnel files.
However, nowadays, to be up to date scientifically, guidebooks intended for laypersons should also measure up against a second standard.
The potential for overreaching is significantly greater when a lawyer, a professional trained in the art of persuasion, personally solicits an unsophisticated, injured or distressed layperson," Kennedy wrote.
I find it hard to buy Graff's assertion that to the layperson, "tragic vision" is just as incomprehensible as "counterhegemonic discursive practices.
This article for the layperson discusses ulcer causes, symptoms, and treatment.
This small and easily affordable volume is an effective resource for the layperson.
While chapters two to four are written in true textbook fashion, they are written for the layperson, and chapters five to seven offer a wealth of information without losing the reader in specifications and technical jargon.
There are no alternative sources of medical care for these patients, according to the nation's emergency physicians, and it violates the federal prudent layperson standard by basing coverage on the patient's final diagnosis, which a physician does not know at the time of triage.
Even now any person may baptize in case of necessity and with the right intention, and a bishop can designate a layperson to preside at marriage and funeral rites.
THOMPSON, a United States church leader and layperson instrumental in bringing the world's Congregationalists and Presbyterians together in the World Alliance of Reformed Churches, and its first president, died at age 87.
Lloyd presents for the layperson a new way to conceive of the origin and nature of the universe Knopf, 2006, 240 p.