rest area

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rest ar·e·a

the portion of a tooth structure or of a restoration in a tooth that is prepared to receive the positive seating of the metallic occlusal, incisal, lingual, or cingulum rest of a removable prosthesis.
Synonym(s): rest seat

rest a·re·a

(rest arē-ă)
Portion of a tooth structure or of a restoration in a tooth that is prepared to receive the positive seating of the metallic occlusal, incisal, lingual, or cingulum rest of a removable prosthesis.
Synonym(s): rest seat.

rest a·re·a

(rest arē-ă)
Portion of tooth structure or restoration in a tooth that is prepared to receive positive seating of metallic occlusal, incisal, lingual, or cingulum rest of a removable prosthesis.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Unprotected lay-bys outnumbered protected ones by nearly four to one on the A34 and by more than two to one on the A303.
AA Motoring Trust road safety head Andrew Howard said: "Drivers need to treat unprotected lay-bys like motorway hard shoulders and get out on to the verge and well away from passing traffic."
On a website called Swinging Heaven, the lay-by is listed as one of the two top sites in the North-East for dogging.
It says: "The Highlander lay-by 1 mile south of Belsay on the road from Ponteland to Otterburn 500yds past the Highlander Pub going north.
The minister of Central Hall, the Rev Peter Mortlock, said: ``While I commend the council's opening up of this area, I believe a basic error has been made in removing the lay-by. It means there is just nowhere safe to stop on either side of the road.''Rita Norman, chairman of the transport sub committee of Coventry's Wheelchair Users' Group agrees.She said: ``The lay-by outside the church needs to be put back.
The concerns raised delayed the development of the lay-by at Plover Road, near its junction with Acre Street.
The lay-by will accommodate lorries making deliveries to a busy shop.
AA Motoring Trust road safety head Andrew Howard said: "Motorists need to treat unprotected lay-bys like motorway hard shoulders and get out on to the verge and well away from passing traffic.