lay midwife


Also found in: Acronyms.

lay midwife

Community midwife, independent midwife Obstetrics A midwife who may have had little formal training or recognized professional education in midwifery, who learned by accompanying doctors or midwives attending home births; LMs became active in the counterculture movement of the 1970s and are the main attendants at home births. See Midwife.
References in periodicals archive ?
The morning was like a drop-in centre where children played together and women conversed while they waited to see the lay midwife of their choice in one of several bedrooms upstairs.
The lay midwife would dip into the clinical world for a while, leisurely checking, for example, the position of the baby, the fetal heart tones and the blood pressure, and would often provide additional information and alternative views about testing and procedures suggested by the physician.
With every baby death that occurred in pre-legislation days in Ontario in which a lay midwife had been involved, an inquest was called.
Early on in lay midwives' work, the knowledge base of the parturient woman and lay midwife were almost equivalent; women learned together as in a self-help group model.
If you live in the following states or the District of Columbia, it is illegal for a lay midwife to deliver a baby: Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, North Carolina, South Dakota and Wyoming.
The Verzis engaged the services of Yvonne Cryns, a lay midwife, who had them fill out a "Client Form.
While Pitocin is used liberally in hospitals to speed up labor, a lay midwife will only use it if the woman's life is in danger.
The bills introduced support licensing lay midwifes by apprenticeship and self study.