lax

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lax

(lăks)
adj. laxer, laxest
1. Not taut, firm, or compact; slack.
2. Loose and not easily retained or controlled. Used of bowel movements.

lax·a′tion n.
lax′ly adv.
lax′ness n.

lax

1 abbreviation for laxative.
2 pertaining to a condition of relaxation or looseness.

lax

(lăks) [L. laxus, slack]
1. Without tension.
2. Loose and not easily controlled; said of bowel movements.
References in periodicals archive ?
We're all looking forward to it,' said Samar Fatany, a columnist and radio presenter in nearby Jeddah, Saudi Arabia's most liberal city where segregation rules are laxly enforced.
The idea is that laws are written strictly but are generally enforced laxly.
The alcohol laws are either too lax or too laxly enforced and it is just wrong that youngsters as young as 11 are drinking alcohol in the street without the intervention of adults.
Consumers chronically inform themselves laxly, understand their preferences hazily, and analyze their choices carelessly.
We and he no doubt often laxly confuse the questions.
154) Similarly, federal animal protection laws either exclude farm animals from coverage altogether (155) or carry insignificant penalties and are only laxly enforced.
In either case, however the hamartia is also more laxly applied to an error due to unavoidable ignorance, for which error is unintentional; it arises from want of knowledge; and its good quality will depend on whether the individual is himself responsible for his ignorance.
JHS can involve a variety of musculoskeletal symptoms, from chronic pain and fatigue to soft-tissue and visceral injury, all in the presence of general joint laxly.
The "other instruments"--alas, their velocities are so different, one "note-value" contradicts another, so the "rhythmic displacement" buries the melody, we laxly keep on doing what we do, improvising, aha, hoping that a spontaneous note or two will be played, but by the time we have worked one rhythm toward some conclusion, there is no unison anywhere, only routine, battered by chance, only bits and pieces, loss, lacerations, even the memories lacerate.
And airport rules regarding airplanes and hangars - once laxly enforced - are now crimping the style of a fraternity of free spirits.
An ideological conviction that government is the problem and that laxly regulated private exchanges are the answer, for instance, has seduced the administration into thinking that rogue states are invariably more dangerous than failed states.