law of universal gravitation

law of universal gravitation

(in physics) the law stating that the force with which bodies are attracted to each other is directly proportional to the masses of the objects and inversely proportional to the square of the distance by which they are separated. See also gravity, mass.
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It was here that Newton undertook his crucial experiment - splitting white light using a prism - and observed an apple fall from a tree, inspiring his law of universal gravitation.
The renowned physicist and mathematician Sir Isaac Newton (right) made history in the late 17th century when an apple fell from a tree in his garden at Woolsthorpe Manor, near Grantham, and he subsequently formulated the law of universal gravitation.
Newtonian gravitation (hereafter gravitation) is the set of consequences which follow from the law of universal gravitation advanced by Isaac Newton in his Principia of 1687 (Walker, 2011).
For example the general theory of relativity involves singular points; the law of universal gravitation does not allow the case where the distance r is equal to zero.
Such views separated him from professional astronomers for whom the stars provided a background "grid" against which the motions of the members of the solar system could be plotted and then interpreted in terms of Newton's law of universal gravitation.
But he did not get his law of universal gravitation sitting alone under a tree getting bonked on the head by falling fruit.
Some of the discoveries chosen were obvious: Copernicus showing the earth is not at the center of the universe, Galileo's discovery of Jupiter's moons, Hooke characterizing cells as the building blocks of life, Newton's law of universal gravitation, Darwin's theory of evolution, Einstein's theory of relativity, and the Watson and Crick model for DNA.
According to Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation, gravity forces act upon a body unless it is set in motion in a region of space sufficiently far away from the influence of other bodies.
His extension of Newton's law of universal gravitation led to outlandish ideas about extraterrestrial intelligence; since "the farther intelligent life-forms are from the sun, the less matter inhibits the unfolding of rationality," humans must occupy a "middle rung" on the "cosmic ladder" of intelligence, between "the small, sun-blackened, and heat-frazzled Mercurians crazily dashing about" and "the ponderous and somber sages of Saturn" (pp.
Subtitled "A Solar System Construction Set," the program demonstrates Isaac Newton's law of universal gravitation as it applies to planets and other objects orbiting our Sun or to hypothetical bodies revolving around an imaginary star.