law of universal gravitation

law of universal gravitation

(in physics) the law stating that the force with which bodies are attracted to each other is directly proportional to the masses of the objects and inversely proportional to the square of the distance by which they are separated. See also gravity, mass.
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His law of universal gravitation brought all scientists down to earth.
Such views separated him from professional astronomers for whom the stars provided a background "grid" against which the motions of the members of the solar system could be plotted and then interpreted in terms of Newton's law of universal gravitation.
It unifies Special Relativity and Sir Isaac Newton's law of universal gravitation with the insight that gravitation is not due to a force but rather a manifestation of curved space and time, with the curvature being produced by the mass-energy and momentum content of the space time.
Some of the discoveries chosen were obvious: Copernicus showing the earth is not at the center of the universe, Galileo's discovery of Jupiter's moons, Hooke characterizing cells as the building blocks of life, Newton's law of universal gravitation, Darwin's theory of evolution, Einstein's theory of relativity, and the Watson and Crick model for DNA.
His extension of Newton's law of universal gravitation led to outlandish ideas about extraterrestrial intelligence; since "the farther intelligent life-forms are from the sun, the less matter inhibits the unfolding of rationality," humans must occupy a "middle rung" on the "cosmic ladder" of intelligence, between "the small, sun-blackened, and heat-frazzled Mercurians crazily dashing about" and "the ponderous and somber sages of Saturn" (pp.
7 Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727) His law of universal gravitation brought all scientists down to earth.
His lack of commitment to any particular regime masked a lifelong love of stability and desire for strong links between scientists and the state that was as strong as his attachment to the law of universal gravitation in all domains, both the celestial and the terrestrial.
According to Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation, gravity forces act upon a body unless it is set in motion in a region of space sufficiently far away from the influence of other bodies.
The Third Law had to be stated in terms of the mutual action-reaction forces being equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to justify the particular form of Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation.
The law of universal gravitation, for instance, applies only when the two bodies in question are, to use Cartwright's term, "shielded" from disturbing influences, such as other nearby bodies.
240)--such as the inability to derive from the universal laws of thermodynamics the nucleotide sequences that are carriers of encoded information in living cells; or the inability to derive from the law of universal gravitation common to all bodies the local motions specific to animals or the opinion-based motions specific to humans (p.