gravitation

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grav·i·ta·tion

(grav'i-tā'shŭn),
The force of attraction between any two bodies in the universe, varying directly as the product of their masses and inversely as the square of the distance between their centers; expressed as F = Gm1m2l -2, where G (newtonian constant of gravitation) = 6.67259 × 10-11 m3 kg-1 s-2, m1 and m2 are the masses (in kg) of the two bodies, and l is the distance separating them in meters.
[L. gravitas, weight]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

gravitation

(grăv″ĭ-tā′shŭn) [L. gravitas, weight]
The force and movement tending to draw every particle of matter together, esp. the attraction of the earth for bodies at a distance from its center.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Beruff, Test of the inverse-square law of gravitation using the 300-m tower at Erie, Colorado, Phys.
It is not, however, obvious that the seemingly reversible Netonian law of gravitation is more correct than the second law of thermodynamics.
Hence it does seem reasonable to count the 'law of gravitation' as invariant, and this in turn suggests that the claim about the invariance of all the laws of nature is too general: it should instead by focused on the subclass of laws specifying the interactions that occur within nature.
The Modified Newton Law of Gravitation due to the Rainbow Gravity
Obviously, (15) is the modified Newton law of gravitation, and [F.sub.0] = GMm/[r.sup.2] is the original Newton law of gravitation.
The classical Newtonian law of gravitation includes on the other hand only one polarity of mass and only attractive forces.
The well known PP method computing forces according to the Newton law of gravitation represents an accurate N-body technique (see, e.g., [2, 3]).
We follow a Gedanken speculation of how Isaac Newton would have derived a law of gravitation if he had been aware of the modern classical tests for a theory of gravitation.
In addition to Newton's three laws of motion and universal law of gravitation, the Principia, which he wrote in only 18 months, contains work on hydrostatics, the motion of solids in resisting media and the propagation of sound waves.
Planck continues: "These quantities retain their natural significance as long as the law of gravitation and that of the propagation of light in a vacuum and the two principles of thermodynamics remain valid; they therefore must be found always the same, when measured by the most widely differing intelligences according to the most widely differing methods" [4; [section]164].
Thus one gets a rather modified Newton's law of gravitation and Kepler's laws defined with this effective constant while retaining their usual forms.
Thus, the inverse-square law of gravitation is derived by methods of hydrodynamics based on a sink flow model of particles.