lavage


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Related to lavage: lovage, Bronchoalveolar lavage, Nasal lavage, peritoneal lavage

lavage

 [lah-vahzh´]
1. irrigation or washing out of an organ or cavity, as of the stomach or intestine.
2. to wash out, or irrigate.
bronchoalveolar lavage a technique by which cells and fluid from bronchioles and lung alveoli are removed for diagnosis of disease or evaluation of treatment; a bronchoscope is wedged into a bronchus and sterile saline is pumped in and then removed along with the fluid and cells to be analyzed.

la·vage

(lă-vahzh'),
The washing out of a hollow cavity or organ by copious injections and rejections of fluid.
[Fr. from L. lavo, to wash]

lavage

/la·vage/ (lah-vahzh´)
1. the irrigation or washing out of an organ, as of the stomach or bowel.
2. to wash out, or irrigate.

lavage

(lăv′ĭj, lä-väzh′)
n.
A washing, especially of a hollow organ, such as the stomach or lower bowel, with repeated injections of water.

lavage

[ləväzh′]
Etymology: Fr, washing
1 n, the process of washing out an organ, usually the bladder, bowel, paranasal sinuses, or stomach, for therapeutic purposes.
2 v, to perform a lavage. Kinds of lavage are blood lavage, gastric lavage, and peritoneal dialysis. See also irrigation.

lavage

Medtalk The washing out of a body cavity–pleural, peritoneal, pericardial cavity or hollow organ to obtain fluids for diagnostic cytology, to detect hemorrhage in blunt trauma, or remove toxins–eg, gastric lavage in overdose. See Bronchoalveolar lavage, Gastric lavage, Tracheobronchial lavage.

la·vage

(lă-vahzh')
The washing out of a hollow cavity or organ by copious injections and rejections of fluid.
See also: gastric lavage
[Fr. from L. lavo, to wash]

lavage

Washing out of a hollow organ or cavity, especially by irrigation. Stomach washout.

Lavage

The washing out of a hollow body organ, for example, the stomach, using a flow of water.
Mentioned in: Fugu Poisoning

lavage

wound flushing with e.g. "Warmasol"

lavage (l·vazhˑ),

n the process of flushing or washing out a hollow organ, particularly the paranasal sinuses, bladder, bowel, or stomach for therapeutic purposes.

la·vage

(lă-vahzh')
The washing out of a hollow cavity or organ by copious injections and rejections of fluid.
[Fr. from L. lavo, to wash]

lavage (ləväzh´),

n the irrigation, or washing out, as in oral lavage. See also irrigator or irrigation.
lavage, fluid,
n spray washing of the periodontal pocket that occurs as the result of fluid flowing through the tip of a mechanized instrument.

lavage

1. irrigation or washing out of an organ or cavity, as of the stomach or intestine.
2. to wash out, or irrigate. See also wash.

abdominal lavage
the infusion of saline into the peritoneal cavity, usually through a catheter inserted through the abdominal wall, for diagnostic purposes. The fluid returned may be examined for red blood cells, bacteria, enzymes, etc. Called also peritoneal lavage.
bronchoalveolar lavage
percutaneous entry of a catheter between tracheal rings, followed by infusion of a small volume of normal sterile saline which is then aspirated. The sample is submitted to microbiological and histopathological examination.
colonic lavage
irrigation of the colon, usually to remove ingested toxins.
gastric lavage
gastric lavage, or irrigation of the stomach, is usually done to remove ingested poisons. The solutions used for gastric lavage are physiological saline, 1% sodium bicarbonate, plain water or a specific antidote for the poison. A gastric tube is passed and then the irrigating fluid is funneled into the tube. It is allowed to flow into the stomach by gravity. The solution is removed by siphonage; when the funnel is lowered, the fluid flows out, bringing with it the contents of the stomach. Called also gavage.
ice water lavage
administration of ice water through a stomach tube is used in the treatment of acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. There is a risk of inducing hypothermia.
ruminal lavage
used in the treatment of carbohydrate engorgement. Serial gavages are performed until the fluid comes back clear. A 2.5 in (6 cm) diameter Kingman tube is necessary if any bulk of material is to be retrieved and a hose from a tap is the only practical irrigating mechanism.
subpalpebral lavage
a method of medicating the eye, particularly useful in treating corneal ulcerations in horses. Tubing is inserted from the conjunctival sac through the upper eyelid and extended onto the head or neck. Medication can then be delivered continuously in a drip.
thoracic lavage
irrigation of a pleural sac via a paracentesis cannula.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, the simplicity of performing intraperitoneal lavage with sterile water does not add unnecessary complications to surgery other than the additional time required.
tsutsugamushi in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from a patient with scrub typhus shows that this bacterium can be present in such samples.
In life-threatening poisonings, activated charcoal is safer than emesis or lavage, but is usually only effective if given within one hour of ingestion.
In comparison, the cure rate with vancomycin alone was 31% (4 of 13 patients), and with vancomycin plus bowel lavage it was 23% (3 of 13).
Their blood was drawn and bronchoaveolar lavage (BAL) was performed for use in ELISpot testing.
Primary decontamination with gastric lavage and activated charcoal should be performed as early as possible.
Shust and colleagues from Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, measured anti-HSV activity and levels of immunity associated with hormonal contraception use by collecting samples of cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) fluid from 16 women once a week for 3-8 weeks.
Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL)--the fluid that isn't a fluid Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is usually performed on hospitalized patients who have non-resolving pneumonia in an attempt to identify organisms that are not responding to antibiotic treatment or to detect malignancy.
In the preface, the editor notes that this book, "is the first and nearly complete collection of applications of proteomics to analyze various human body fluids, including plasma, serum, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, pleural effusions, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, sputum, nasal lavage fluid, saliva, pancreatic juice, bile, amniotic fluid, milk, nipple aspirate fluid, seminal fluid, vitreous fluid, dialysate, and ultra-filtrate yielded during renal replacement therapy.
The trial will be a 16-week, double-blinded comparison with 300 patients randomized between SinuNase (intranasal lavage of 0.
Sputum cultures and bronchoalveolar lavage for Pneumocystis jejuni, as well as bacterial, fungal, and mycobacterial evaluations, were negative.