latrine

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latrine

(lă-trēn′) [L. latrina, lavatrina, washroom]
A toilet, typically a large open receptacle excavated in the ground, often used in military settings.

pit latrine

A type of outdoor latrine, used where it is impractical to provide a standard, flushing-type toilet. The structure, which is excavated in the soil, may be manufactured and installed so that odors and flies are minimized.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
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'It is a shame that some residents don't have own latrines. It is among problems likely to cause poor hygiene-related diseases.
Our objective was to investigate whether activity at river otter latrines influenced the local behavior (i.e., site use and activity patterns) of other riparian mammals via olfactory cues.
'They built latrine besides their house by own initiatives with the help of upazila and union councils," she said.
The first public latrine facility, Visal said, cost $40,000 to build, $35,000 of which was funded by South Korea's Suwon City Hall, with the rest paid by the Preah Sihanouk provincial administration.
Ms Tshireletso also said Gaborone and Francistown city councils primary schools were connected to a centralised sewer network system that was functional, and that there was currently no need for use of pit latrines.
With the help of the AEL technicians, family members dig their latrine pits to a depth of 10 feet, gather sticks, and create the structure of the latrine.
The chapters are unfurled in a logical sequence and cover such topics as urban case studies of the best preserved public latrines in Pompeii, Herculaneum, Rome, and Ostia; hygiene and sanitation through the lens of cross-cultural anthropology and archaeological theory, with brief overviews of biblical, European, Muslim, Hindu, Chinese, Japanese, and Vietnamese examples; sanitation in Rome, with the star appearance of the Cloaca Maxima; what Roman toilets reveal about a less-than-desirable level of Roman public health; the Roman concepts of public and private; the moral superiority of elites who used wealth to ensure their privacy; and finally the valuable evidence supplied by relevant Roman wall paintings and written sources.
It is estimated that 2.7 billion people use on-site sanitation word-wide and of these 1.77 billion use some kind of a pit latrine. Of those using some form of pit latrines, 65% are found in Sub-Saharan Africa [1].
Oxfam has also constructed latrines and shower shelters, and initiated a hygiene promotion campaign among the tens of thousands of the internally displaced persons.
Their reluctance to countenance the problems of open defecation (relieving oneself in fields and around bushes) and dirty latrines is not just squeamishness about feces.
The project also includes constructing latrines in houses to promote safe, hygienic latrines.
of India provides fund to build sanitary latrines in all villages, schools for families of below poverty line families & above poverty line families through Samgra Swachhata Abhiyan through respective Janpad Panchayats.