lateral pinch

lateral pinch

a grasp in which the thumb is opposed to the middle phalanx of the index finger. Also called key pinch. See also palmar pinch, pinch, tip pinch.

lat·er·al pinch

(lat'ĕr-ăl pinch)
A grasp pattern in which the object is held between the thumb pads and the radial side of the index finger. (Also referred to as a key grasp).

lat·er·al pinch

(lat'ĕr-ăl pinch)
A grasp pattern in which the object is held between the thumb pads and the radial side of the index finger. (Also referred to as a key grasp).
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References in periodicals archive ?
Lateral pinch strength measurements were done with the palm facing medially while force was exerted between the pad of the thumb and the opposing lateral side of the middle phalanx of the index finger through the opposing surfaces.
They reported 95% of 22 patients studied as having excellent pain relief and satisfaction, even with activities that required significant lateral pinch (i.
Statistically significant differences were found between the TOS patients and the referent group in the results of peripheral nerve function tests such as the median of the distal strength, lateral pinch and palmar pinch of the hands, and vibrotactile thresholds.
Results of the lateral pinch grip strength assessment showed that pinch width had a significant effect on pinch force, with the average (across participants) force increasing from 1 to 5 cm, peaking at 5 cm, and declining at the 7-cm grip span.
The results of the aforementioned two studies are clearly contradictory in their description of the relationship between lateral pinch grip force and lateral pinch grip span.
Both prototypes supported the use of up to six preprogrammed grip patterns: power grip, tool grip, chuck grip, lateral pinch, fine pinch open, and fine pinch closed.
Scores of individual usability items showed higher rankings for the following items in Gen 3: socket and harness doffing, chuck grip, tool grip, pinch grip, lateral pinch, power grip, and grip switching (p < 0.
The lateral pinch applies force between the thumb and index finger and uses muscles other than those in the tunnel.
However, it would be beneficial to evaluate the lateral pinch force in future studies.
Lateral pinch strength was measured with pinch-meter (Irvington, NY10533, US) at the same position.
TAM for the fingers and thumb, lateral pinch strength, and hand grip strength were significantly lower for the replanted hand compared to the contralateral non-injured hand (p<0.
Light divided the 14 ADL into 6 prehensile patterns: A = spherical grip, required in 10 percent of the tasks; B = tripod pinch grip, required in 10 percent; C = power grip, also known as cylindrical or hook grip, required in 25 percent; D = lateral pinch grip, required in 20 percent; E = tip pinch grip, required in 20 percent; and F = extension grip, required in 10 percent [5].