bud

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Related to lateral bud: leaf scar, Terminal bud, Plant bud

bud

 [bud]
1. a structure on a plant, often round, that encloses an undeveloped flower or leaf.
2. something resembling the bud of a plant, especially a protuberance in the embryo from which an organ or part develops.
end bud the remnant of the embryonic primitive knot, from which arises the caudal part of the trunk.
limb bud one of the four lateral swellings appearing in vertebrate embryos, which develop into the two pairs of limbs.
tail bud
the primordium of the caudal appendage.
taste b's end organs of the gustatory nerve containing the receptor surfaces for the sense of taste.
ureteric bud a dorsal outgrowth of the mesonephric duct near its entry into the cloaca; it is the primordium of the ureter, renal pelvis, calices, and collecting tubules of the kidneys.
bud of urethra bulb of urethra.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bud

(bŭd),
1. An outgrowth that resembles the bud of a plant, usually pluripotential, and capable of differentiating and growing into a definitive structure.
See also: gemmation.
2. To give rise to such an outgrowth.
See also: gemmation.
3. A small outgrowth from a parent cell; a form of asexual reproduction.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bud

(bŭd)
n.
1. Botany
a. A small protuberance on a stem or branch, sometimes enclosed in protective scales and containing an undeveloped leaf, flower, or leafy shoot.
b. The stage or condition of having buds: branches in full bud.
2. Biology
a. An asexual reproductive structure, as in yeast or a hydra, that consists of an outgrowth capable of developing into a new individual.
b. A small, rounded organic part, such as a taste bud, that resembles a plant bud.
v. budded, budding, buds
v.intr.
1. To put forth or produce buds: a plant that buds in early spring.
2. To reproduce asexually by forming a bud.

bud′der n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

bud

Botany
A small swelling or projection on a plant, from which a shoot, cluster of leaves or flowers develop; a rudimentary, undeveloped shoot, leaf or flower.

Drug slang
A regional term for marijuana.

Embryology
See Syncytial bud.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bud

(bŭd)
1. An outgrowth that resembles the bud of a plant, usually pluripotential, and capable of differentiating and growing into a definitive structure.
2. To give rise to such an outgrowth.
See also: gemmation
3. A small outgrowth from a parent cell; a form of asexual reproduction.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bud

an undeveloped embryonic shoot in a plant containing a meristematic area (see MERISTEM) for cell division, surrounded by leaf primordia (immature leaves) with often an outer protective layer of scales formed from modified leaves. The tip of a twig usually carries a terminal bud, while leaves generally have a lateral bud in their AXILS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The hybrid 'Golden Torch' was the most productive heliconia, both in emission of flower stems and lateral buds, as observed by RODRIGUES (2010) under the conditions of Porto Velho, RO (Brazil).
In vitro culture and plant regeneration from shoot tip and lateral bud explants of Gypsophila paniculata L.
When cytokinins are applied to the whole plant they will overcome apical dominance, thereby promoting lateral bud break.
The effects of far-red light on lateral bud outgrowth in decapitated tomato plants and the associated changes in the levels of auxin and abscisic acid.
Encapsulated lateral buds were pre-cultured in liquid WPM supplemented with 0.75 M sucrose and 1.0 M glycerol, under constant stirring of 150 rpm for 24 hours, with subsequent dehydration in an airflow hood for 1 hour.
Lateral buds of apogeotropic shoots are very important in forming the aftermath of many cereals.
Plant growth regulators, genotype and type of explants affect the culture initiation: Apical meristem and lateral buds (eyes) were selected for culture initiation on shoot initiation MS media (SI1, 0.1 mg L-1 GA3; SI2, 0.1 mg L-1 Kn; SI3, 0.1 mg L-1 BAP+0.1 mg L-1 Kn + 0.1 mg L-1 GA3+0.1 mg L-1 NAA) containing either cytokinin (0.1 mg L-1 Kn) or gibberellin (0.1 mg L-1 GA3) or combination of cytokinins, gibberellin and auxin (0.1 mg L-1 BAP + 0.1 mg L-1 Kn + 0.1 mg L-1 GA3 + 0.1 mg L-1 NAA).
A metamer of PA 1 can bear a maximum of two lateral buds of PA 2 (i.e.
It is sometimes referred to as the terminal bud, whereas axillary buds are the same as lateral buds. The apical meristem tends to have a high concentration of auxin compared with axillary buds, causing it to grow more, and inhibiting growth in axillary buds (Fig.
Reorientation of shoot to horizontal position influences the sugar metabolism of lateral buds and shoot internodes in Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia
Bromeliads have "monocarpic" shoots, meaning that they die after flowering (the growth point that creates the shoot switches from producing leaves to producing flowers, and then dies), but growth can continue from lateral buds. This has profound implications for such potentially long-lived plants as the Leviathans shown here.
Because of the dominance of the main meristem, lateral buds do not usually develop.

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