incubation period

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incubation

 [in″ku-ba´shun]
1. the provision of proper conditions for growth and development, as for bacterial or tissue cultures.
2. the development of an infectious disease from time of the entrance of the pathogen to the appearance of clinical symptoms.
3. the development of the embryo in the egg of oviparous animals.
4. the maintenance of an artificial environment for a newborn, especially a premature infant.
incubation period the interval of time required for development; especially the time between invasion of the body by a pathogenic organism and appearance of the first symptoms of disease. Incubation periods vary from a few days to several months, depending on the causative organism and type of disease.

period

 [pēr´e-od]
an interval or division of time; the time for the regular recurrence of a phenomenon.
absolute refractory period the part of the refractory period from phase 0 to approximately −60 mV during phase 3; during this time it is impossible for the myocardium to respond with a propagated action potential, even with a strong stimulus. Called also effective refractory period.
blanking period a period of time during and after a pacemaker stimulus when the unstimulated chamber is insensitive to avoid sensing the electronic event in the stimulated chamber.
effective refractory period absolute refractory period.
ejection period the second phase of ventricular systole (0.21 to 0.30 sec), between the opening and closing of the semilunar valves, while the blood is discharged into the aorta and pulmonary artery. Called also sphygmic period.
gestation period see gestation period.
incubation period see incubation period.
isoelectric period the moment in muscular contraction when no deflection of the galvanometer is produced.
latency period
latent period a seemingly inactive period, as that between exposure to an infection and the onset of illness (incubation period) or that between the instant of stimulation and the beginning of response (latency, def. 2).
refractory period the period of depolarization and repolarization of the cell membrane after excitation; during the first portion (absolute refractory period), the nerve or muscle fiber cannot respond to a second stimulus, whereas during the relative refractory period it can respond only to a strong stimulus.
relative refractory period the part of the refractory period from approximately −60 mV during phase 3 to the end of phase 3; during this time a depressed response to a strong stimulus is possible.
safe period the period during the menstrual cycle when conception is considered least likely to occur; it comprises approximately the ten days after menstruation begins and the ten days preceding menstruation. See the section on fertility awareness methods, under contraception.
sphygmic period ejection period.
supernormal period in electrocardiography, a period at the end of phase 3 of the action potential during which activation can be initiated with a milder stimulus than is required at maximal repolarization, because at this time the cell is excitable and closer to threshold than at maximal diastolic potential.
vulnerable period that time at the peak of the T wave during which serious arrhythmias are likely to result if a stimulus occurs.
Wenckebach's period a usually repetitive sequence seen in partial heart block, marked by progressive lengthening of the P–R interval; see also dropped beat.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·cu·ba·tion pe·ri·od

1. time interval between invasion of the body by an infecting organism and the appearance of the first sign or symptom it causes; Synonym(s): incubative stage, latent period (2) , latent stage, stage of invasion
2. in a disease vector, the period between entry of the disease organism and the time at which the vector is capable of transmitting the disease to another human host.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

incubation period

The time elapsed between infection and appearance of disease Sx. Cf Latent period Epidemiology A period of subclinical or inapparent pathologic changes after exposure, ending with the onset of Sx of an infection.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·cu·ba·tion pe·ri·od

(in'kyū-bā'shŭn pēr'ē-ŏd)
1. The interval between invasion of the body by an infecting organism and the appearance of the first sign or symptom it causes.
Synonym(s): incubative stage, latent period (3) , latent stage, prodromal stage.
2. In a disease vector, the period between entry of the disease organism and the time at which the vector is capable of transmitting the disease to another human host.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

incubation period

The interval between the time of infection and the first appearance of symptoms of the resulting disease. Incubation periods vary widely, from as little as a few hours in the case of CHOLERA to many weeks in some cases of RABIES.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Incubation period

The interval from initial exposure to an infectious agent, such as a virus, and the first symptoms of illness.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·cu·ba·tion pe·ri·od

(in'kyū-bā'shŭn pēr'ē-ŏd)
1. The interval between invasion of the body by an infecting organism and the appearance of the first sign or symptom it causes.
Synonym(s): latent period (3) , latent stage, prodromal stage.
2. In a disease vector, the period between entry of the disease organism and the time at which the vector is capable of transmitting the disease to another human host.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Leeuwarden still is in the latent stage which implies that volume, identity, recognition of raison d'etre and the niche market one would like to serve are not yet developed enough (Arthurs et al., 2007).
* This cost per case was estimated as the expected cost of the following clinical outcomes of syphilis: primary, secondary or early latent stage syphilis (probability, 0.61; treatment cost, $53); late latent stage syphilis with no lumbar puncture (probability, 0.199; treatment cost, $467); late latent stage syphilis, including a lumbar puncture (probability, 0.041; treatment cost, $675); inadvertent treatment (probability, 0.134; treatment cost, $0); late benign syphilis (probability, 0.007, treatment cost, $1,094); cardiovascular syphilis, including the need for cardiac surgery in some cases (probability, 0.005; treatment cost, $13,931); and neurosyphilis, including the need for long-term nursing home care (probability, 0.004; treatment cost, $56,806).
When susceptible people are infected, they enter a latent stage which varies from person to person.
The outbreak is modeled by dividing the population into those who are still susceptible to the disease, those who have contracted the disease and are in the latent stage, those who are infectious and symptomatic, and those who have recovered from the disease (Figure 1).
The severity of this stage is generally enhanced in patients with intestinal infection, hyperpermeability episodes, nutrient deficiency, and other comorbid conditions.[13] It is during the early latent stage that symptoms, if present at all, are atypical.
Nanomaterials have a size dimension close to the scale of molecules, opening many opportunities for cancer diagnosis, tumor imaging, and drug treatment, even when these malignancies are at their earliest latent stages. These exciting opportunities greatly inspired researchers' efforts in combining nanotechnology with oncology.
Feng, "Global stability for an HIV/AIDS epidemic model with different latent stages and treatment, " Applied Mathematical Modelling, vol.
Because early and late latent stages represent syphilis of longer duration than primary and secondary stages, trends in early latent and late latent syphilis rates echo those of the primary and secondary stages, peaking somewhat later in time.