latent infection


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

la·tent in·fec·tion

an asymptomatic infection capable of manifesting symptoms under particular circumstances or if activated.

latent infection

an infection that does not produce visible signs of a disease, but may be transmitted to another host.

la·tent in·fec·tion

(lātĕnt in-fekshŭn)
Asymptomatic infection capable of showing symptoms under some circumstances or if activated.
References in periodicals archive ?
For these asymptomatic (symptomless) treatments, latent infection test was negative for all the treatments except for G etunicatum+ Bacillus in Tigoni that tested positive.
The detection of viral protein is typically characteristic of active replication, instead of the latent infection. Therefore, detection of viral antigen in post-mortem fresh, frozen or fixed samples of lymph nodes and trigeminal ganglia during latent infection is theoretically producing negative results.
Herpes zoster (HZ) occurs due to reactivation of a latent infection of VZV present in the dorsal root sensory ganglia.
However, the results of PCR in adipose tissue could not show the presence of latent infection among obese children in the current study.
Post harvest infections can be managed as pre harvest sprays in the field to reduce the latent infection and treatment of the fruit with hot water/ fungicides after harvest to eradicate left over latent infection.
acnes invades intervertebral discs via iatrogenic operations, which may result in discitis, while other routine modes of infections lead to latent infection [5].
Although many methods can detect CMV presence, and even quantify the virus, in a relatively simple manner, there is no gold standard that will consistently distinguish latent infection from active disease, thus making clinical decisions difficult.
Studies suggest that active TB will develop in 5-15% of people with latent infection during their lifetimes.
However, it should be noted that steroids can reactivate a latent infection or cause an intraocular infection to spread.
Lead researcher Professor Emil Coccaro, from the University of Chicago, said: "Our work suggests latent infection with the Toxoplasma gondii parasite may change brain chemistry in a fashion that increases the risk of aggressive behaviour.
Professor Emil Coccaro, from the University of Chicago, said: "Our work suggests that latent infection with the Toxoplasma gondii parasite may change brain chemistry in a fashion that increases the risk of aggressive behaviour."
Initial examination of 181 contacts determined that 39 (22%) had latent infection: 10 (42%) of 24 who had close exposure to either patient, 28 (28%) of 100 who were exposed to one or both patients in church, and one (2%) of 57 exposed to the second patient at a school.