latent content


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content

 [kon´tent]
that which is contained within a thing.
latent content in freudian theory, the hidden and unconscious true meaning of a symbolic representation, such as a dream or fantasy, as opposed to the manifest content.
manifest content in freudian theory, the content of a dream or fantasy as it is experienced and remembered, and in which the latent content is disguised and distorted by displacement, condensation, symbolization, projection, and secondary elaboration.

la·tent con·tent

the hidden, unconscious meaning of thoughts or actions, especially in dreams or fantasies.

latent content

Psychiatry The unconscious significance of thoughts or actions, especially in dreams or fantasies; LC in dreams is expressed in distorted, disguised, condensed, and symbolic form

la·tent con·tent

(lā'tĕnt kon'tent)
The hidden, unconscious meaning of thoughts or actions, especially in dreams or fantasies.
References in periodicals archive ?
The following research questions guided the latent content analysis portion of the study:
A latent content analysis is needed to shed light on this finding, as well as the seeming notion that there were so few differences between male and female representation in these texts otherwise.
Discussion of Manifest and Latent Content Analyses: The Erasure of Male Social Workers
Taking into consideration how the manifest content and latent content analyses inform one another places the data in Agger's (1989) work on critical theory of text.
After exploring the literature on Latino teachers' identity formation, sociopolitical awareness, and advocacy, he applied the inductive analysis to identify the latent content of these categories.
The latent content of the discussion in this category reflected awareness of the relationship between their own experiences with native language preservation and the sociocultural implications of language loss in schools and society.
The latent content of this discourse had to do with their apparent formulation of a willingness to follow in Fillmore's footsteps to become activist teachers in a reconceptualization of their professional identities.
Retrospective reflections like these offered an additional dimension for the latent content of the discourse in both categories, the realization that not only were these topics essential for the students' professional growth, but that they had been inexcusably absent from the preservice curriculum that they experienced.
The results of our latent content analyses appear in Tables 4A and 4B.
Latent content analyses revealed that four of the general American government texts and eight of the presidency texts contain only minimum coverage of first ladies (see Tables 4A and 4B).